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Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

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  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

    Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    Author: Roy H Lubit, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Caroly Pataki, MD
    Medscape Medical Reference

    Defining Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition - Text Revision (DSMIV-TR) as a recurrent pattern of negativistic, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behavior toward authority figures that persists for at least 6 months and is not due to a mood or psychotic disorder. To fulfill the diagnosis, an individual must have 4 of the following:
    • Often loses temper
    • Often argues with adults
    • Often actively defies or refuses to comply with adult requests
    • Often deliberately annoys others
    • Often blames others for his or her mistakes or poor behavior
    • Often touchy or easily annoyed
    • Often angry or resentful
    • Often spiteful or vindictive
    • Symptoms are almost always present at home and may or may not be present in the community and at school.




    The complete PDF article is attached to this post for download / viewing / printing
    Attached Files
    Steve
    TouretteLinks Forum

  • #2
    Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

    Many thanks. You always publish such educational and encouraging articles. My grandson is displaying ODD behavior, and it is very worrisome. Your information gives us much needed guidance, from here we have a better understanding of what we have do, to better support him and love him through this difficult time.

    From Tampa, USA

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    • #3
      Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

      Thank you for your kind words, mignat! It should be noted the articles I re-post have been written by authorities and experts in the field, and full credit is always indicated at the top of the re-posted article, with a link back to the original article URL.

      Has your grandson been diagnosed with other coexisting disorders along with the ODD?

      FYI I have a number of ODD related articles on the "virtual shelf" I was intending to post in the weeks to come, if this is an area of interest to you.

      In the meantime, have a look at this article, which contains a video explaining ODD
      Steve
      TouretteLinks Forum

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      • #4
        Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

        Steve: In response to your email, yes my grandson has been diagnosed with TS, and he is also being treated for ADHD. And as I mentioned on my previous email, has been displaying ODD behavior for more than 4 months. They live in Bethesda, Maryland ( not far from Washington DC, in case you know of any TS specialist in their area.

        Sincerely, Mignat

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        • #5
          Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

          Attached is a PDF list of CBIT therapists listed by State. You will notice several therapists in Maryland including Dr. Matt Specht, one of the top researchers and CBIT therapists in the Country.

          My list is not up to date, so you can get a more recent list by calling the Tourette Association of America or the Greater Washington DC Chapter of TAA, which serves Maryland for their up to date referral list:

          Greater Washington DC Chapter - Serving Maryland, Virginia, and Washington DC
          410-867-1151
          e-mail admin@tsagw.org
          website: Home | TSA - Greater Washington
          Attached Files
          Steve
          TouretteLinks Forum

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

            Forgive my ignorance, but what does CBIT stands for?

            Mignat

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Overview

              I apologize for being presumptuous

              Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics is a cognitive approach combined with habit reversal therapy in a comprehensive program that usually lasts eight to ten weeks that can help kids around the age of twelve and older as well as adults learn to manage their tic symptoms.

              I guess I got ahead of myself as well by not asking your grandson's age, which may affect his eligibility for CBIT.

              Our Forum contains a wealth of information on behavioural therapies, in the Forum Section Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) which contains an overview article I wrote on CBIT which you may find helpful.

              Is your grandson currently receiving any form of therapy or counseling or treatment for his symptoms? How is he getting along in school, at home with family members and socially with playmates and classmates?
              Steve
              TouretteLinks Forum

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