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Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
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  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


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Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Self-injury

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  • Self-injury

    I have an annoying tic in which I need to hit myself in the face from time to time, just above my right eye, with my right hand. The harder, the more satisfying.

    Anyone else have these kinds of tics? Where you need to hit yourself, or something else, in such a way that it can hurt?
    Colin

  • #2
    Self-injury

    When I get very upset (my husband making me feel like I'm worthless) I might have a meltdown and punch myself in the head with both fists repeatedly. I've also in that kind of situation cut the back of my thumbs and once the back of my hand with my fingernails (which leaves ugly scars). But I don't know if those things are due to AS or TS or both.
    German citizen, married to a Canadian for 28 years, four daughters, one son, eight grandchildren (and one on the way).

    Comment


    • #3
      Self-injury

      My son does this with his fist and when it is really bad he will try running his head into an object, like a tall bed post or coffee table.

      The walls used to get it or a door jam. He prefers standing up now when this pattern happens.

      I have to hold on to him or keep my hand over the area of the forehead he wants to bash.

      We usually both get hurt, but he does not get it as bad as my hand.

      This is one action that can cross over to other concerns and people do not understand it is a tic.

      In his mind something has gone wrong, and he has not done something right...or just takes blame for something he had no control over.
      I am still trying to figure out all the signals but it is weird because he seems to feel better once it is over, welps and bruises aside.

      Do you do this during a stressful or anxiety moment?
      PJK

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      • #4
        Self-injury

        I sometimes scratch my fingers with my nails until sometimes I cut my skin. I also have hit myself in rage almost from my TS in my shoulder but Im not sure it was TS or just anger.
        The other day at a local grocery store, I saw a rack with books on it and one of them said, "pregancy for dummies"............

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        • #5
          Self-injury

          The one I described was a regular tic. Seems to be present frequently during the day.

          Sometimes, though, I've had feelings like your son, PJK, where I've wanted to hit myself with something when stressed or anxious. I'm not sure if that's TS, though, or a part of something else.
          Colin

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          • #6
            Self-injury

            Cailean:

            I understand your question too. My son has anxiety and ODD too. But for some reason most people with a multiple disorder concern seem to have the impulse or tic to self injure.

            The pattern seems to be there but the causes or connection to a specific disorder does not seem to exist.

            Hopefully with some general feed back we will be closer to the answer. :D
            PJK

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            • #7
              Self-injury

              Ugh... this tic was over-active yesterday, and now my face is a bit swollen beside my right eye.
              Colin

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              • #8
                Self-injury

                Cailean:

                That can happen and always the discomfort seems to stay with you for a couple days after one bad day.

                Warm compress or better yet, hot water bottle works. If it is bruised, a cold compress will help but only touch lightly over and over again. A headache can follow if you hold the cold on to long.

                I wish you the best and can so relate to what you are up against.

                Hang in there you have friends on this site.
                PJK

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                • #9
                  Self-injury

                  Thanks. It was acting up again yesterday but I think I'm ok now.

                  I think if anyone notices this kind of injury in the future, I'll just explain that I was in a bar fight. :P
                  Colin

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                  • #10
                    Self-injury

                    A bar fight? lol

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Self-injury

                      Oh, yea, being in a bar fight is better than discussing a genetic disorder. Huh? Did I miss something? Who are you hanging out with?

                      Okay, folks, seriously, what you are describing in the first 6 or so posts are compulsions. Compulsions can follow a sensory input, such as a bug bite or a scratch, or even a reaction to clothing that is uncomfortable. Also, some compulsions are in essence creating sensory input. A great, but scary, example is the compulsion to feel blood on your fingers. This is not that rare. I don't know about you, but unless you work in a butcher, or in a hospital, or are yourself a vampire (a vampire with TS+ ?) there is really only one easy way to fulfill this compulsion, and that is to bleed. I think some sex addictions are specific compulsions - the 'need' to feel something sexual, or an orgasm, or something we percieve as having to come from sex. Me personally, some of my eating stuff is oral tactile compulsion. I want to FEEL myself eating something. Chewing gum took cafe of this for a while, until my jaw-popping tics.

                      Sometimes I think the TS+ has a will of its own. I know this sounds like "voices in your head" to outsiders, but it is a bit different. You ever yell at your computer, like it CHOOSES to crash, just to spite you? Same idea...

                      Tics are, by definition, supposed to be unmotivated, random. We know that some of them are directed, in context, the result of some stimulus, but this is still in doubt. However, whenever I really talk to people about bizarre or socially inappropriate or motivated tics, we finally get down to it being a compulsion. And that brings me back to unpopular theory #1: TS is just a subset of OCD, NOT the other way around. Tics are, in this theory, a sensory compulsion of something subtle. Maybe tics are a compulsion of your proprioceptive system. Maybe tics are a compulsion of endorphines, which are released when you pop joints and such - for example, cracking your knuckles releases a bit of them. So does popping your neck or back vertebrae. Ticcing is a drug addiction in a preverse sense, if you follow my track here.

                      Please feel free to go off on me about this. I love this discussion. Who's first? Borrow a set of gloves, and let's go for three minutes.
                      Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
                      http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Self-injury

                        Well, my face-hitting tic is more of a tic (as in TS) rather than a compulsion (as in OCD). There's no thought behind it or reason to do it. It can happen anywhere, when I'm happy, upset or anything. There's no obvious trigger or associated obsession.
                        Colin

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                        • #13
                          Self-injury

                          There's no obvious trigger or associated obsession.
                          Except the trigger of having a face? LOL I have one where I have to bang my chin and it feels 'tic-like'. but then I often had to do it to my boyfriend's chin and that always felt compulsion-like.... so weird, this arbitrary line between tic and complusion. ACK!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Self-injury

                            Let me back up a second here: compulsions do not REQUIRE a thought or impulse. I know a LOT of Touretters who have compulsions, and tell me they have them under control, WHILE THEY ARE DOING THEM. The crotch grabbing tic is the best example. It is NOT a tic, in this case. It is a sensory compulsion, with no thought or reason. Behavior modification for tics makes no difference at all with this compulsion, because that is the wrong tool for the job.

                            Thought and reason are components of obsessions, not compulsions. Do not forget, these are neurological concepts that are older than the definition of Tourette's, and are not exclusive to any disorder. That is why I have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, not Obsessive Disorder. Why would you have to say both? You have to, because they are completely different. The confusing part (and I agree, it is a difficult distinction to deal with in yourself) is that in TS+ they happen together very, very often.

                            Think about this: how many symptoms are there in OCD? Two? Wrong. Three. Surprise! In computers, two bits, or 'switches' is two Yes or No decisions. 2x2 is 4. Since 'No, No' in OCD is no symptoms, which is no disorder, that leaves three. Here is the list:

                            Symptom #1: Yes, No = Obsession
                            Symptom #2: No, Yes = Compulsion
                            Symptom #3: Yes, Yes = Obsessive Compulsion

                            By definition, everyone with OCD is capable of having symptoms that they are not cognizant of - compulsions. This is not as crazy as it sounds. I had tics my ENTIRE life, and did not notice them until someone pointed them out to me on a video tape of me giving a lecture. What was I lecturing on: how to teach math and science to kids with, get this, Tourette's, ADHD, and OCD. If you can miss tics, you can certainly miss compulsions.

                            I am not addressing any one person's symptoms. I am simply outlining the definitions of the terms (concepts?) that comprise OCD. Bottom line: just because you don't think about it, does not mean it is NOT a compulsion. That gets us back to "Unpopular Theory #1": TS is a subset of OCD, not the other way around. Tics are compulsions of our passive systems, the ones that monitor our body, instead of our thoughts or feelings.

                            Please, please, please let me know if 1. this makes sense and 2. if you have a way to counter my hypothesis. Like I said before, this is the frontier of the Tourette's discussion - this is the exciting stuff. Bring it on! I won't take it personally if you won't. :-)
                            Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
                            http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Self-injury

                              Well when we come down to the reality of it, it's not so clear.

                              "Tourette's Syndrome", "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder" ... realistically these disorders exist within spectrums, and these are just the names we give them. Medical science has yet to pinpoint the exact cause of these disorders, so yes - it's possible that they're both the same thing with varying degrees of severity and impact on behavior. It's also possible that many cases of TS are actually just a type of OCD, while other diagnosed cases of TS are completely seperate. The links between our physical brains and our behaviours are still something of a mystery. What we know is the tip of the iceberg -- so while we draw analogies and develop terminology, we must expect that anything we say about the causes and classifications of our observed behaviors is likely flawed -- it's theory.

                              Also, every tic is a compulsion. By the definition of the word compulsion, a tic - simple or complex - is a compulsion.

                              However, I tend to differrentiate between OCD and Tourette's (because at least in popular medicine, they are somewhat seperated by a hazy, blurry line) by the nature of the compulsion.

                              When it comes to tics (TS), I tend to consider them to be recurring at random or continuous times, regardless of my current thoughts or environment and without provocation. My eyes blink constantly, I make strange noises and I occasionally slap myself in the face. I often don't notice these at all... although I will notice the noises in public if they draw attention, and I will notice my slapping once it's done, simply because it hurts.

                              When it comes to compulsions from OCD, they're usually linked to either an obsession or thought, or to something in my environment. I repeatedly push the elevator button because I feel the elevator will fall otherwise. I carry a small bottle of Purell with me, or run to wash my hands, every time I have to open a door.

                              I can see the difference further when I'm medicated, exhausted or distracted. When I'm not thinking much - especially because of medication that sedates me - I sometimes forget about certain obsessions. I'm mentally exhausted and I'll sometimes forget to push the button on the elevator until I've passed several floors. (When I remember though, it's a bit of a panic). My tics continue regardless of fatigue.

                              Ultimately, whether they're seperate, associated or variations of the same thing, it is worth mentioning the difference between these two types of compulsions (tics and OCD compulsions). The criteria I describe satisfies me, because it helps me know how to control which symptoms.

                              But all in all, we may set up as many classifications and definitions as we choose -- but we must remember, our brains and bodies are indifferent to our language, and are likely to suprise us.
                              Colin

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