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Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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day time and night time tics

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  • day time and night time tics

    i as thinking about this last night as i lay in bed ticcing and twitching,
    i have different tics for daytime ,mainly sniffing/snorting,winking
    but at night they are different,nodding alot,shoulder shrugging,and opening my eyes constantly when i need them closed ! :x
    anyone else have diffferent tics for day and night time?
    jo

  • #2
    day time and night time tics

    Now that you mention it, there does seem to be a variation in the "nocturnal" repertoire ...

    Do you know if you tic while you sleep?
    Steve
    TouretteLinks Forum

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    • #3
      day time and night time tics

      i dont know,i was thinking just last night that i may video record myself but im too scared of what i might see :?
      jo

      Comment


      • #4
        day time and night time tics

        We tic in our sleep. The 80% rule applies here - some Touretters must have such mild sleep tics that no one notices or cares, even with a video camera.

        TS is generated in the basal ganglia, part of the lower or crocodilian brain. Sleep is an aspect of higher functioning in the brain. In my opinion, we sleep so much because we process so much, as compared to other animals. Processing abstract language takes a lot of flops (flop = computer doing one thing).

        Why would we NOT tic when we sleep? That part of your brain never rests - if it did, we would die the first time we took a nap. Our hearts and lungs don't need us to be awake, or even cognizant of them. Heck, human beings did not know about some of our organs until they looked inside a body and saw them. Leeches were used to remove one of the FOUR liquids of the body. Um, by high school you should be able to name quite a bit more than four.

        As for the tics changing during sleep, when do tics NOT change over time, or based on circumstances? My tics react to stimulus. My Mom (Mrs. Pruitt) loves to get me up on stage and prove this point by discussing tics I have. In front of a thousand people, with my mother describing me rotating my shoulders, well, you know... My neck tics LOVE ties. Tics, ties. Hmmm... I sense a conspiracy in the words. Call Robert Langdon.

        Sorry. As I was saying, the tics do seem to react to context, like changes in clothing, temperature, STRESS, present company included, blood sugar levels, caffeine, everything. Sleep reduces incoming stimulus by what, 90%. It shuts down major brain centers and slows down some autonomic systems. So maybe the tics just do not have enough 'friends' to play with.

        I hope I did not get too preachy there. Here is what I would like to see happen: someone with a PhD and a grant needs to video tape a few thousand of us sleeping, and find out what the PATTERN is to the change in tics when we sleep. My money is on less vocal / breathing tics, but I am open minded. I would also guess that gross (large) motor tics that are highly unsuccessful during waking get to come out and play. Imagine how hard it would be to walk if both legs were twitching at the same time. I would also like to see the % of Touretters that have no tics that show up on tape during sleep. No bet here - it could be anything. And what about tics during REM sleep, versus other layers of sleep?

        One of the big problems with Touretters is that we self-report like Enron accountants - not at all, or incorrectly, most of the time. "How much do you tic during sleep?" "Uh, I'm asleep - how would I know?" Ha ha. But even when awake, we do not have full awareness of our tics. Thanks the heavens. If I 'knew' about every tic I would go mad. I certainly would not be able to sit still long enough to write something as long as this. If we studied sleep tics more, it would reduce the chance the Touretter could skew the information.
        Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
        http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

        Comment


        • #5
          day time and night time tics

          hmm,sleep studies,that would be interesting !
          my husband says i twitch my legs alot when i am sleeping and kick my feet up
          jo

          Comment


          • #6
            day time and night time tics

            I punched holes in things during Storms, rage attacks, as a teen. Imagine how delighted, really happy, I was when I found out one day that I had kicked a hole in the drywall next to my bed, and did it during my sleep. I ticced a hole in the wall, while asleep. It was NOT MY FAULT! Yea!

            Yes, true story. Of course, I now know that none of my TS+ was my FAULT, but at 15 this is how I reacted.
            Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
            http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

            Comment


            • #7
              day time and night time tics

              I punched holes in things during Storms, rage attacks, as a teen
              I have a new hole in my wall from last weekend when my 7yo had a little episode. My husband fixed it immediately since it is in the common area of our home...plus one of my twins decided to see if his foot fit it... anyway, I have watched him sleep on occassion and he moves very little. My 13yo (approx 6 feet tall) wakes up every morning with no sheets on his bed...do you think he might be moving, just a little? Everymorning as I complain that his sheets are off again...I never once thought about it from this perspective... Thankfully we have yet to get holes in the wall during sleep...yet! :D
              Janet

              TSFC Homepage

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              • #8
                day time and night time tics

                Janet, I have the 80% rule in my back pocket whenever I talk about TS. I have to assume not everyone with TS has any one particular tic. And really, I don't know anyone else who kicked a hole in the wall during sleep. I think this is an unusual combination of things that are not a big stretch for TS folks. Just all together, it adds up to X-Files kinda stuff. "No, Muldar, I do not think this kid could have done this..." Hey, that would be a good short story - Muldar and Sculley investigate someone with bizarre TS+. Copyright, copyright! Ha ha.

                My husband fixed it immediately
                7 years old is not too young to start learning how to repair drywall. I was doing it at that age. It is awesome for rebuilding (literally) the self esteem of the child. There are about 14 other benefits that you can likely see for yourself. The TS child MUST MUST learn how to clean up after themselves. Some of the 'wisdom of Sherry Pruitt' goes like this: you can not avoid making mistakes. It is not about avoiding mistakes, it is about how you clean them up. I know it seems like a long way in the future, but you do not want to have to visit the college dorm room to fix things, he needs to do this himself, and starting very young is totally okay, developmentally, emotionally, self-esteem wise, etc.

                I am working on writing this stuff up, so I can put it on the web site and it can soon go into my first book, but here is the short version: my family practiced having storms. Seriously. Like a fire drill. When everyone was awake, calm, fed, etc., we would gather in the living room, and I would go "Storm, storm, storm". And the rest of the family would say out loud, "Oh, look, Darin's having a storm." And then we would run the fire drill. IT WORKED! Think about trying that. Another way to build self-esteem in your son, is to let him clean it up BEFORE it happens.

                Good luck.
                Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
                http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

                Comment


                • #9
                  day time and night time tics

                  And then we would run the fire drill.
                  Darin -- Can you share what you did in the 'fire drill'? Was it getting you to a safe place? What else was involved?

                  This is a big topic for those families that have kids that 'storm'. Some specifics on what worked for your family would be a great help.

                  Thanks!
                  Cathy
                  Forum Moderator

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    day time and night time tics

                    7 years old is not too young to start learning how to repair drywall.
                    Hey Darin

                    I have learned that from being around so many people who were more experienced and knowledgeable than me so that was my immediate response to my Husband. It's okay, make him fix it. However, my husband is pretty much a "normie" and due to the normie dad Y-chromosome, he has not read anything or gone anywhere to try to understand what we are living with, so he turned into the "FIXER Dad" and fixed it because that's what he does. In the meantime, my son has a hole in his bedroom wall that happened a while ago that is not fixed and when he developes the "skill of drywalling" then it will be fixed. So I hear your advice... we are working on it.

                    I too would like to hear what you do in a "fire drill". When I anticipate a storm I quickly encourage quiet time in their rooms so things can settle... sometimes it works
                    Janet

                    TSFC Homepage

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      day time and night time tics

                      I'm working on a storm article right now. Coming soon...

                      Your husband is 'enabling' your son. Will he go with him to college and repair things there for him? It sounds dumb, but a lot of Dads fail this test the first time... I am not judging - it is a tough issue to deal with. My Dad failed this test, too.

                      :-)
                      Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
                      http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        day time and night time tics

                        I agree with Darin, one of my first thoughts was that even at the age of 7, he should learn to fix it. Maybe if you point out to Dad that it would be great father-son bonding.

                        As far as kicking holes in walls, my boyfriend once punched a hole in the wall in his sleep. At 6'4" there wasn't much room in the bed lengthwise and I think he was just trying to stretch. NO Tourette's there, by the way.

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