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Tourette Canada Online Forum is a free, safe, moderated online community where registered users can exchange ideas, information and support about issues related to Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Canada has recently changed the server and refreshed the pages so returning members will notice a brighter look. Tourette Canada welcomes back two former moderators, Janet Rumsey and Cathy Wylie, to the Forum. Their knowledge and insight will serve the Tourette Forum participants with dedication and expertise.

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Please Read This Before Posting in Tic Parade

Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Re-Directing Tics

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  • Re-Directing Tics

    This is a little bit off the subject:

    I was actually able to re-direct or block tics, before I found out about Tourette's. However, it was not exactly a healthy way to re-direct symptoms. I can discuss in another thread if anyone is interested. However, I was able to learn how to postively re-direct through other techniques.

    I guess what I'm saying is: behavior therapy, re-direction, meditation, breathing techniques, whatever it is, works on tics if you BELIEVE that they do, assuming the technique is something valid for focus, control, calming the body or mind, etc.
    Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
    http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

  • #2
    Re-Directing Tics

    sounds interesting

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    • #3
      Re: Re-Directing Tics

      I like to think that my re-directing my tics work, and it does for the most part. But every now and again (usually during difficult exams) my TS puts me back in my place and sets off a series of unstoppable tics for extended periods of time.
      TS and Chorn's disease, two diseases triggered by stress. Why am I going into special education one of the most stressful professions out there?

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      • #4
        Re: Re-Directing Tics

        I like to think that my re-directing my tics work, and it does for the most part. But every now and again (usually during difficult exams) my TS puts me back in my place and sets off a series of unstoppable tics for extended periods of time.
        It is thought that people with Tourette have a higher baseline anxiety level that the general population, probably because we are constantly on guard when trying to suppress tics.

        In situations where there is added stress, such as when taking exams, the new stress accumulates to the already high stress level, and as we know that tics are made worse by stress it is to be expected that tic activity would increase under these circumstances.

        Does this added tic activity cause you any difficulty with fellow students or teachers?
        Last edited by Steve; January 18, 2007, 07:36 PM. Reason: edits
        Steve

        Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

        Tourette Canada Homepage
        If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
        Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

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        • #5
          Re: Re-Directing Tics

          While my added tics tend not to bother my professors and peers in my special education classes, I tend to have a lot of problems in classes outside my major.

          Because of my hearing loss I have trouble hearing some of my professors who have habits which do not lend themselves to being heard well, such as always facing the board, or mumbling. I had a professor a few semesters ago who did just that. I didn't have a chance, while I was always good at math, I soon found myself in a position where I had no idea what was going on about 3/4ths of the time. Because I couldn't follow and focus on the material my tics would start up, which would draw nervous looks from the other students. The teacher just ignored me in the beginning, then worked his way towards open hostility. Since it was a math class, I didn't take my test at the DSS so as to be able to ask the professor questions. While my vocal tics are never bad, or at least not very audible, I was soon coughing very loudly and making all sorts of weird noises. then my arms started flailing. It was a mess. Sufficient to say that I ended the course with a D. I decided to take the course again, this time over the summer, where there would be fewer students, and I had talked to the professor before the semester started. The class was much nicer, and I ended it with an A+. Now if that doesn't tell you something about the importance of a decent professor than I don't know what does.
          TS and Chorn's disease, two diseases triggered by stress. Why am I going into special education one of the most stressful professions out there?

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          • #6
            Re: Re-Directing Tics

            This is a great example of how important it it that people with TS be comfortable to advocate for themselves. It is your money when in program such as these so taking the initiative to meet with the prof ahead of time is great.

            Thanks for sharing this story. There are many Teens with TS who participate in our forum and they can certainly benefit from lessons or best practises you can share about being in college.

            The need for a good educator is critical in the success of a student.
            Janet

            TSFC Homepage

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