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Welcome to the updated and refreshed Tourette Canada Online Forum!

Tourette Canada Online Forum is a free, safe, moderated online community where registered users can exchange ideas, information and support about issues related to Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Canada has recently changed the server and refreshed the pages so returning members will notice a brighter look. Tourette Canada welcomes back two former moderators, Janet Rumsey and Cathy Wylie, to the Forum. Their knowledge and insight will serve the Tourette Forum participants with dedication and expertise.

We would like to thank the administrators and moderators who have dedicated countless hours to build and maintain the Forum. We look forward to continuing to provide a place for individuals and families affected by Tourette Syndrome and its associated disorders to get information, exchange information with others, and connect with the affiliates and support available across Canada.
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Please Read This Before Posting in Tic Parade

Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Vocal Tic Definitions

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  • Vocal Tic Definitions

    Simple Vocal or Phonic Tics - Throat clearing, yelping and other noises, sniffing and tongue clicking.

    Complex Vocal Tics - Uttering ordinary words or phrases out of context, echolalia (repeating a sound, word or phrase just heard) and in rare cases, coprolalia (vocalizing socially unaccceptable words).

    Echolalia- Involuntary repetition of words or phrases said by others; the involuntary parrot-like repetition (echoing) of a word or sentence just spoken by another person.

    Palilalia - Repeatedly saying one's own words or phrases

    Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words including excessive and uncontrollable use of foul or obscene language, including words related to feces (bowel waste).


    Persons with Tourette syndrome might also curse out of anger or displeasure, but they should be able to discern between an angry outburst and an uncontrollable compulsion.

    Coprolalia can upon occasion also be a symptom of schizophrenia, a severe psychiatric disorder of thought in which the sufferer loses touch with reality, withdraws from social activity and exhibits bizarre behavior. The schizophrenic may curse for no apparent reason.

    There is no known relationship between Tourette syndrome and schizophrenia.

    Undiagnosed persons with Tourette syndrome or schizophrenia are often subjected to public ridicule from persons within earshot of a coprolalia outburst. Observers believe the outburst is the result of a conscious and voluntary decision to swear. It is not. Medication is available to control the outbursts.

    Persons who swear excessively, repeatedly and deliberately -- that is, they swear because they want to --are not technically exhibiting coprolalia, although the media often applies the term loosely to them.

    "Coprolalia" is derived from the Greek words "kopros" (dung) and "lalein" (to babble).
    Last edited by Steve; April 16, 2013, 07:42 PM. Reason: edit content for clarification
    Steve

    Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

    Tourette Canada Homepage
    If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
    Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

  • #2
    Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

    Thank-you ,very useful & helpful information Steve! makes me feel more at ease.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

      Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words including excessive and uncontrollable use of foul or obscene language, including words related to feces (bowel waste).
      Hi Steve!

      Just wanted to say that I wish there were another word, besides "coprolalia", to describe involuntary utterances that are socially inappropriate but not foul or obscene.

      For example, saying "I love you!" to strangers on the bus! And other things that are taboo in certain social situations. Like "corner office", when the corner office at work is going to be reassigned to someone and you hope to get it.

      I wish another name, like maybe "tabulalia", could be used to describe these utterances. For me at least, that would make it easier to explain to people when they ask.

      Twidget

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

        Twidget,

        I wish there were another word, besides "coprolalia"
        And there is another way to explain to others when necessary.

        The terms listed in this explanation are the medical terminology used to precisely describe the symptom of Tourette, most often used when discussing your symptoms with your doctor, another person with Tourette...a kind of techno-speak.

        However when explaining our symptoms of Tourette to co-workers, family or friends (when necessary) it is usually sufficient to say something like, "The sounds or movements I make are because I have Tourette Syndrome. It's a neurological disorder that causes involuntary muscle movement, sounds or even phrases"

        You would, of course, customize the explanation to suit the circumstance, but always keeping the important keywords:
        • Tourette,
        • Neurological disorder,
        • Involuntary


        It's important that your message highlights the fact that involuntary means the actions are not behavioural.

        Behaviour can be modified, involuntary actions cannot.

        Keep a printed overview of Tourette Syndrome handy, written by a competent and recognized authority if you ever have to support your verbal explanation.

        Some of these can be found HERE and a wider selection in the entire section HERE.

        Have you ever tried developing redirection strategies to deal with situations like on the bus?
        Steve

        Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

        Tourette Canada Homepage
        If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
        Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

          Have you ever tried developing redirection strategies to deal with situations like on the bus?
          The examples given are just some that I've heard from other people I know with Tourettes. In my case, it's just one short phrase which can be covered pretty well because I say it very quickly. But, technically, I do have coprolalia. Most people where I live have heard of Tourettes; they're just curious.

          I've been reading about redirection strategy here on this forum. Something I never knew about. Will continue studying this to learn more. Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

            Where can I find that post on redirection strategies?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Vocal Tic Definitions

              Geneva,

              I'm not sure I remember where to locate some earlier posts on tic redirection, but I'll see if I can find them. In the meantime, you may wish to try a Forum search for the term "redirection".

              However, to bring the discussion up to date, the recent findings on Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Tics CBIT are the current recommendation of TSFC and many other Tourette authorities as the first choice therapy for children.

              CBIT teaches what many of us in the "old days" learned on our own, where the child is taught to recognize the promonitory urge before the tic is expressed, and they learn re-direction techniques to lessen the noticeable impact of the actual tic.

              A favorite re-direction technique I used and still do when necessary, is to clench my toes inside my shoes, or twist my ankle when seated, instead of expressing a facial tic or some other upper body tic that would be noticed by someone nearby.

              The idea is to find ways of satisfying the urge in a more "socially acceptable" manner when in the presence of others, to camouflage or suppress the actual tic, while temporarily satisfying the urge for the primary tic.

              A search for the term CBIT will bring you to the various posts and articles on that subject.
              Steve

              Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

              Tourette Canada Homepage
              If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
              Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

              Comment

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