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Please Read This Before Posting in Tic Parade

Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Sniffing

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  • Sniffing

    Does your child or yourself sniff like you have constant allergies?

    My son can and I feel bad because as a small child I used to think he had seasonal allergies.

    We have found that this is a tic that often happens and the teacher used to complain about it, not realizing it was TS.
    PJK

  • #2
    Sniffing

    Im just going to make this easy and answer yes to all of the posts in this thread. The only vocal tic I have not experienced is coprilia(spelling?)
    The other day at a local grocery store, I saw a rack with books on it and one of them said, "pregancy for dummies"............

    Comment


    • #3
      Sniffing

      I am with Adam......my son does everything posted too!

      Has any of you heard tell of selective mutism? Had my son for his 6 month check up yesterday....and his doc said he got selective mutism. Is this another part of TS coming out or just something that happens?

      Comment


      • #4
        Sniffing

        I sniff all the time too. I don't notice anymore, but I could really tell one day when I tape recorded a conversation between myself and my 4 year old nephew. Wow do I sniff a lot!!! LOL

        I've never heard of selective mutism being a part of Tourette's. I think it's a seperate thing altogether. But I believe it's considered an anxiety disorder and I would imagine that it's connected to social phobia??? I have social phobia (though I've never had selective mutism) and I can say that for me, the social phobia is FAR more debilitating than any ticcing I've experienced. This wasn't recognized as something to be treated though, in the 70's, from my experience. (I was just considered 'shy', and wasn't that so cute, but now get over it! :? ) I'm so glad it is now seen to be more than just 'shyness'.

        Did the doctor make any recommendations??

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        • #5
          Sniffing

          He told me to ignore it! How can I help him if he won't talk?

          Comment


          • #6
            Sniffing

            he told you to ignore it? I am so surprised to read it, so I typed 'Selective Mutism' into Google and just came up with this. http://www.selectivemutism.org/ and the FAQ http://www.selectivemutism.org/FAQ.htm. I know for me, social phobia was horrible and it sounds like, from this website, that this is indeed possibly where Selective Mutism stems from. This was in the FAQ
            Waiting to see if a child will "outgrow" SM or overcome it on his/her own is not advised. Studies indicate that the earlier a child is treated for Selective Mutism, the quicker the response to treatment, and the better the overall prognosis. If a child remains mute for many years, his/her behavior can become a conditioned response where the child begins to believe that he/she will never be able to speak in certain settings or to certain individuals. The children also begin to fear more and more that people will "make a big deal over it" if they begin speaking. In other words, Selective Mutism can become a difficult habit to break!

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            • #7
              Sniffing

              OMG I dont sniff its more like snorting...I sniff so hard that I swear my nose with blead...and ppl think my nose is running and that I am a pig when really that isnt it at all. I'm 14 and trust me when I say for me that was one of the worse tics I have ever had. I was diagnosed about 5 years ago but I have had tics since i was in kindergarten so I totally know what your son is going through.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sniffing

                Yes, I sniff too. But I am not always sure if it's a tic, or if I sniff because my nose is always running. I think that sometimes it's a tic, and sometimes it's allergies with me.

                Selective mutism is most often a part of autism, rather than stemming from a social phobia. A lot of people on the autistic spectrum have tics as well, and can be misdiagnosed with TS, or they can have both, like me (it's a matter of severity I guess, all autistic people have some tics, but not necessarily as many as me).
                German citizen, married to a Canadian for 28 years, four daughters, one son, eight grandchildren (and one on the way).

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                • #9
                  Re: Sniffing

                  Hi my son is sniffing now and like you I am not sure if it is his alergies for a tic because he is also sneezing and blowing his nose.

                  unfortunatley for me it is the one noise I cannot stand (like nails on a chalkboard) so I try to leave the room whenever it gets to be too much for me. I am hoping this tic will be short lived.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Sniffing

                    Sniffing and throat clearing are the two most common tics shared among most people with Tourette.

                    Although tics wax and wane and even change with time, I would not want to give you false hope about sniffing going away. Many people I have met with Tourette seem to continue this particular tic indefinitely.
                    Steve

                    Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

                    Tourette Canada Homepage
                    If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
                    Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Sniffing

                      I don't post often, but this thread peaked my interest. All four of my children have TS and all of them have nasal tics. Sniffing, snorting, forceful nasal exhalations, etc. These tend to be the tics that have staying power. The other tics are more transient.

                      In addition, my oldest (13) had a number of early diagnosis that did not hold up over time, but the first was selective mutism. The evolution of this 'symptom' has been a general social anxiety disorder (not officially diagnosed). Since we homeschool, this symptom has not interfered in her life too much and she now has a large social circle, but it takes her significantly longer to develop relationships with new people.

                      Even though I don't participate in 'conversations' that often, please be assured that I enjoy and learn immensely from the conversations of others.

                      Linda

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                      • #12
                        Re: Sniffing

                        Welcome Linda!

                        I am glad you have found the forum a good source of information. Did you know there is a great search function that can direct you to specific issues you may need info on? I have found it very useful on many occasions.

                        Thanks for saying hi and we hope to see more of you. New perspectives and points of view are always welcome. We all learn from each other here.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Sniffing

                          Thank you for the welome. I consider my TS education an immersion experience, as my DH also has TS. I have been lurking on the forum since its early days and the stuggle some families undergo overwhelms me. We have had it easy compared to most here.

                          Linda

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Sniffing

                            Hi Linda,

                            Glad you posted your note. You are quite right that some families have a lot more difficulty in finding ways to deal with how Tourette affects their particular situation.

                            Being able to share concerns and frustrations with others in similar situations gives us a chance to lighten the burden but mainly to learn strategies from the experiences of others.

                            Thanks for being a long time member; feel free to join in anytime!
                            Steve

                            Dum spiro spero....While I breathe, I hope

                            Tourette Canada Homepage
                            If you enjoy the TC Forum, please consider a Tourette Canada membership
                            Please visit our sister Forum: Psychlinks Psychology and Mental Health Support Forum

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Sniffing

                              Sniffing was my very first tic. The only nasal tic I have is exhaling through nostrils, and even that I haven't had for awhile. I was of those people who had almost everything on 'the list' (on a long list of vocal and motor tics for both simple and complex that I found on the net a long time ago, the only ones I never experienced were about 5 total in different areas. There were maybe 30 total or more..much of mine were severe too).

                              Being a certified ECE Educator, selective mutism, I had experience working with a girl like that, and it takes lots of time and patience to get them to say 1 word. It is not a good idea at all to ignore it, because without speaking, children go without vital social skills aquired through speech that is important for them to learn. I believe seeing a therapist, alongside trying to get them to say one or two words a day and gradually increasing it, or having them be with someone they're comfortable with (parents, guardian, best friend, etc) and having them spend time with them while being encouraged to speak, are some ways I'm familiar with for treating those children.

                              Selective mutism is, as far as I know, completely separate from TS and its associated disorders (ADD, ADHD, OCD, etc, and all the problems that come with them lol! Oy..).

                              I'll add the doctor most likely said to ignore the selective mustism because they may have been thinking the child is having some form of tantrum in order to get what they want. Tell the doctor that you have been told by people with experience and having looked up information on selective mustism, that you shouldn't ignore it and if the doctor could point you in the right direction for therapy. If they are still unhelpful, find another doctor.

                              Always get a second opinion, especially with doctors. No one doctor will know everything or be able to help with everything, or even know anything at ALL. In my experience, most regular family doctors and hopsital doctors are useless in diagnosing possibly severe illnesses and disorders, writing it off as something completely different that only makes life harder, not easier. Though that's just from my personal experiences not only with TS but with learning disabilities as well.
                              Marisa

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