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Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Echolalia as the word of the day

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  • Echolalia as the word of the day

    Dictionary.com made a very common tic into the word of the day, but neglected to mention it was a tic.
    From the TSFC's Understanding Tourette Syndrome: A Handbook for Educators:

    "Any repetitive, involuntary sound that a person makes can become a tic.
    Echolalia is the repeating of sounds, words or parts of words of other."

    In practice, children can repeat the words of their teachers and be accused of not being respectful.
    They can also sit in front of the TV or at a movie and repeat lines from the actors.

    Our advice is to ignore tics like echolalia, drawing attention to them, or telling a child to stop the tic
    often increases the child's anxiety, which increases the tics, which makes the situation worse.

    Here's dictionary.com's definition. I found the origin of the word to be rather interesting.
    If children living with TS are asked to stop the tics, they can pine away like Echo, feeling that they aren't accepted.
    Better to find strategies to help them control the tics in a positive way.

    echolalia \ek-oh-LEY-lee-uh\ , noun:
    1. The imitation by a baby of the vocal sounds produced by others, occurring as a natural phase of childhood development.
    2. Psychiatry. The uncontrollable and immediate repetition of words spoken by another person.

    At the time when speech is being learned, there begins a period of echolalia in which the child repeats with tireless continuation all the words or sentences it hears; either completely, or else their closing cadences.
    -- Kurt Koffka, The Growth of the Mind: An Introduction to Child Psychology
    These "terrestrial echoes" where the "swamp's echolalia," according to Kiwi, who liked to make geography as pretentious as possible.
    -- Karen Russell, Swamplandia!
    I had cultivated a mild sort of insanity, echolalia, I think it's called. All the tag ends of the night's proofreading danced on the tip of my tongue.
    -- Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer

    Echolalia originates from two Greek roots: echo derived from the name of the mythic nymph Echo fabled to have pined herself away to nothing but her name, combined with lalia meaning "talk or prattle."
    Tina, Forum Moderator, TSFC Staff Liaison

    TSFC Homepage
    TSFC Membership

  • #2
    Re: Echolalia as the word of the day

    Originally posted by Tina View Post
    Dictionary.com made a very common tic into the word of the day, but neglected to mention it was a tic.
    From the TSFC's Understanding Tourette Syndrome: A Handbook for Educators:

    "Any repetitive, involuntary sound that a person makes can become a tic.
    Echolalia is the repeating of sounds, words or parts of words of other."

    In practice, children can repeat the words of their teachers and be accused of not being respectful.
    They can also sit in front of the TV or at a movie and repeat lines from the actors.

    Our advice is to ignore tics like echolalia, drawing attention to them, or telling a child to stop the tic
    often increases the child's anxiety, which increases the tics, which makes the situation worse.

    Here's dictionary.com's definition. I found the origin of the word to be rather interesting.
    If children living with TS are asked to stop the tics, they can pine away like Echo, feeling that they aren't accepted.
    Better to find strategies to help them control the tics in a positive way.

    echolalia \ek-oh-LEY-lee-uh\ , noun:
    1. The imitation by a baby of the vocal sounds produced by others, occurring as a natural phase of childhood development.
    2. Psychiatry. The uncontrollable and immediate repetition of words spoken by another person.

    At the time when speech is being learned, there begins a period of echolalia in which the child repeats with tireless continuation all the words or sentences it hears; either completely, or else their closing cadences.
    -- Kurt Koffka, The Growth of the Mind: An Introduction to Child Psychology
    These "terrestrial echoes" where the "swamp's echolalia," according to Kiwi, who liked to make geography as pretentious as possible.
    -- Karen Russell, Swamplandia!
    I had cultivated a mild sort of insanity, echolalia, I think it's called. All the tag ends of the night's proofreading danced on the tip of my tongue.
    -- Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer

    Echolalia originates from two Greek roots: echo derived from the name of the mythic nymph Echo fabled to have pined herself away to nothing but her name, combined with lalia meaning "talk or prattle."
    ---------- Post Merged at 11:56 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 11:33 PM ----------

    Hi Tina:

    Can you say that again? - oh, never mind, I already did .

    The "pining" concept is new to me wrt echolalia. Is this about trying to bring back a past moment or feeling ?

    Len .

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