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Please Read This Before Posting in Tic Parade

Your input into the Tic Parade will provide valuable insights for parents of children with Tourette, adults with Tourette in addition to health professionals treating persons with Tourette.

The Tic Parade is a library or encyclopedia of Tourette tics in which each tic is described by the person who experiences or observes that tic.

Some tics are preceded by an urge or sensation in the affected muscle group, commonly called a premonitory urge. Some with TS will describe a need to complete a tic in a certain way or a certain number of times in order to relieve the urge or decrease the sensation.

By providing insights into what is observed as well as what is experienced might help the person with the disorder as well as those living with the person cope and know how to deal with their tics.

When posting the description of the tic you wish to discuss, go to the appropriate Forum section Head and Neck, Torso, Limbs or Vocal and title your message with one or two words that describe the tic.

For example some topic titles could be:
  • Barking
  • Finger Flicking
  • Head Twisting
  • Shoulder Rolling
  • Choking Sounds
  • Abdomen Twitch


When discussing coprolalia, please use common sense in describing the nature of the words or terms being used. Although some latitude will be allowed in the use of the actual word or term, any exaggerated or flagrant use of profanity on the Forum will not be tolerated and postings will be removed.

Coprolalia - Involuntary utterances of obscene or inappropriate statements or words

See also Overview of Tourette Tics
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Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

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  • Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

    For those of you who have found success, is there any guidance available to help younger folks learn to re-direct a loud vocal tic (the throat clearing/dry cough) to a quiter version? My daughter has become stressed about needing to do this and is aware that if you have a motor tic and no one is looking, then they won't know, but obviously if you are loud enough and the students in class are not looking, they will still hear her. We have encouraged her to start wearing a little arts/crafts beaded necklace that she can fiddle with to alleviate some stress (she already broke the first one, so this one is a bit more heavy duty! :D ). I don't want to stress her out by telling her to do something else, but any suggestions on what someone else has gotten to work for them is worth a try. She is 9 so this may be a concept that is not a do-able thing yet. The relaxation techniques have sooo not worked yet, but we are still game for new ideas.

  • #2
    Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

    Bugzmom,

    Tic suppression and redirection is probably the one most effective strategy a person with Tourette can employ to control the manifestations of Tourette.

    Therapists teach the technique and refer to it as CBIT.
    Last edited by Steve; September 11, 2012, 12:10 AM. Reason: removed dead link
    Steve
    TouretteLinks Forum

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    • #3
      Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

      Steve-This is exactly what I was looking for. I can't remember where I heard about this concept in the first place, but there is not much about it in the clinical research info that we receive. I am just desparate for anything to help my daughter, as the handful of meds in the AM and PM are not working. I know the meds won't cure them and it seems like when we find a good ADHD med, the tics get worse and vice versa (too bad they couldn't make the kind that don't exacerbate the TS!) and then the tics distract her or her class as much as the ADHD. She is a good kid, as they all are, but it is so hard to sit and watch and nothing that the doc seems to try works for very long. I understand this will be a never ending cycle of up/down/wax/wane, but I just want her to have all the "tools" like redirecting available to her. I think I have read too much scientific information that this forum of "real life" is a breath of fresh air! Thanks again.

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      • #4
        Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

        Bugzmom,

        I seems like many people with Tourette learn redirection techniques out of necessity. Unfortunately some people are unable to suppress or redirect tics, but those who can are able to temporarily suppress can do well in certain social and employment situations.

        Glad to hear Our Forum has been helpful. Please continue to participate in our online community to share your experiences with our members.
        Steve
        TouretteLinks Forum

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        • #5
          Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

          bugzmom, I really think a lot of people don't develop good 'redirection and suppresion skills' until they're older. I think I was about 15 when I felt like I could somewhat successfully 'hide' my TS. She's probably slowly developing them now, but it's definitely not a skill that's learned overnight.

          Since the relaxation methods aren't working, why don't you try the opposite end of it and try exercise. Relaxation wouldn't make a difference to me, but some high-energy exercise will significantly impact my tics for days. (I usually go to a dance club and dance for several hours, but since she's nine, maybe jogging, walking the dog quickly around the block, hiking, joining a soccor team.. ????

          but if the tics aren't bothering her too much, of course, and I'm sure you know, ignoring is always the best policy.

          (((Hug)))

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          • #6
            Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

            My son is going on 13 and just learning how to redirect successfully though other times it just happens.

            One thing I've noticed that works for him is simply changing what he is doing. For example, in class if the coughing is loud, he gets up to walk and get a drink of water. Depending on how bad it is he has several places he can go at different lengths.

            The coughing tic can be worse at night and when he uses the computer or watches TV.

            Exercise does work for him though I've heard others it can make things worse. Biking is his favorite and it helps him sleep at night when he should. Skating, ball, bowling even helps.

            Hope these ideas help you situation.
            PJK

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            • #7
              Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

              well wen i have a tic in class or out and about i stamp my feet or clinch my hand to a fist i also get a pen and folded paper so its thibk and draw on it hard, some times this workis some times not
              it anit my fault, its the way i am

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              • #8
                Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

                hmmm repressing tics can be hard so I try to occupy myself I will try the biking more often this is all good to know

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                • #9
                  Re: Re-Directing or suppressing Tics

                  Steve can you give me that article link agian? I cannot access it from your post. The one on re-directing/supressing tics that is. Thanx!

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