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Adult adaptation with TS

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  • Adult adaptation with TS

    I was just reading the article about adults with TS and I thought it was very informative.

    I do wonder what will the future hold for my son?

    Will his tics bother him so much that it will affect his ability to get a job? Will he be able to support his family?

    Adult life is a period of adaptation.
    How have you managed the transition from childhood to adulthood?

    Did any of your fears about the future with TS become true?

  • #2
    Adult adaptation with TS

    Steph,

    I believe it all depends on the severity of your son's tics and whether he is able to suppress to any degree.

    Tic suppression and tic re-direction seem to be two common strategies used by people with Tourette whose disorder is such that they can accomplish these temporary ways to cover their tics.

    OTOH there are many people with Tourette who express their tics constantly and it has no bearing or effect on their employment or relationships.

    I feel a lot has to do with one's self esteem, self confidence and one's ability to explain to those around about their tics and what the tis are.

    People with Tourette need to be adaptive and to learn the strengths they have as a result of their Tourette. By using these strengths. they can find the kind of employment at which they can excel.

    Tourette is not an obstacle in life. People with Tourette have jobs, get marries and have kids.
    Steve
    TouretteLinks Forum

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    • #3
      Adult adaptation with TS

      I don't think informing people of a person's TS has so much to do with self confidence or self esteem as much as knowing how the other person will react.

      Many people don't confide in others based on the stigma that society places on chronic illnesses especially one classified as a mental illness.

      However, people do seem to have very different experiences. Some other people are very open about it and will inform anyone who asks.

      What do you think makes the difference in how people cope with their TS?

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      • #4
        Adult adaptation with TS

        What do you think makes the difference in how people cope with their TS?
        From my personal experience and with the families I know in our area, I have found the biggest difference has been exactly what you said earlier... some people are open and talk about it and others hold it as a secret sometimes out of fear and sometimes just because they don't anticipate there could be a benefit to disclosing. Right from the initial diagnosis our family has been out and my kids talk about TS like they would talk about having freckles... it is part of who they are. Others in our area have not approached it from this perspective and now as their kids are getting older it is much harder to cope.

        Keep in mind that the majority of adults diagnosed were diagnosed later in life ( like Me and Steve) and just coped as we aged and made choices in life. Now I can look back and evaluate my life and things are now so clear. Organizations such as the TSFC and all their volunteers have done so much for TS awareness that I personally don't anticipate that kids being diagnosed will have half the struggle people did years ago.
        Janet

        TSFC Homepage

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        • #5
          Adult adaptation with TS

          Originally posted by Steve
          I feel a lot has to do with one's self esteem, self confidence and one's ability to explain to those around about their tics and what the tis are.
          Hear, hear! Well said, Steve!

          TS+ is not the bottom line. It is just something on the list. I'm not a tic, I'm a person, and I have skills and abilities that have nothing to do with TS+. Or maybe I should say I have them despite it. Also, I'd rather have TS+ than a hundred other disabilities. Keeping a postive outlook is very important.
          Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
          http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

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          • #6
            Adult adaptation with TS

            Originally posted by tourettetiger
            I have skills and abilities that have nothing to do with TS+. Or maybe I should say I have them despite it.
            And then some! I have skills and abilities BECAUSE of my TS+.

            For example -- I'm the one of the best proofreaders in the company I work for. I'm pretty confident that this is very closely tied to my obsessive-compulsive disorder. I'm the only one who notices (or cares) if someone uses an em dash when they should have used an en dash. I'm asked to proofread lots of things because of this.

            Although it's not really my job, it does make me more valuable because I'm the last set of eyes to view marketing material before it goes online.

            Every cloud has a silver lining... you just need to embrace it, accept it, and move on with it.
            Colin

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            • #7
              Re: Adult adaptation with TS

              Cailean:

              Almost everywhere I have worked my bosses and/or co-workers have relied on me for proofreading and editing. On my performance reviews, it always says, "Thorough. High quality of work." I do NOT correct them.

              For the record, what is the difference (and I'm not too embarassed to say that I'm a writer who does not remember) between an em dash and an en dash. More importantly, how do you get !@#$& MS Word to stay consistent with them? :-)

              Please advise.
              Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
              http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

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              • #8
                Re: Adult adaptation with TS

                Originally posted by tourettetiger
                For the record, what is the difference (and I'm not too embarassed to say that I'm a writer who does not remember) between an em dash and an en dash. More importantly, how do you get !@#$& MS Word to stay consistent with them? :-)
                The en dash (?) is used to indicate a relationship, or a range. For example, the years 1999?2006 or a father?son picnic. It is longer than a hyphen/minus (-), although the hyphen/minus can be used when this character is unavailable.

                The en dash can also be used like a hyphen when the two joined ideas are already hyphenated, or consist of mulitple words. For example, "Scottish Gaelic?English dictionary" or "ADHD is a high-energy?high-movement disorder". (It's hard to notice the difference in the second one, but the middle dash is an en dash, while the other two are hyphens.)

                The em dash is the longer one (?). It has two uses. The first is an open range, such as "John Smith (1979 ?). The second is to indicate a break in thought in a way similar to parenthesis. A good example?or, perhaps, a mediocre one?is this sentence.

                When an em dash is unavailable, as it often is in plain text, you can use a hyphen-minus sign twice (--) to achieve the same effect.


                I have no idea how to fix Word... most of my editing is with XHTML. I hate Word, and I avoid using it.
                Colin

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                • #9
                  Re: Adult adaptation with TS

                  Well, that is awesome! Thanks so much for the information. You never know what you will learn in the Forum.

                  And now, I'm going to Dash off and write that down on my marker board. I will let you know when I find out why we need three of those dash-thingees. Gotta go do some other--less fun--stuff first, though.
                  Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
                  http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

                  Comment

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