Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: I'm not from Canada but I don't know where else to go

  1. #1

    Default I'm not from Canada but I don't know where else to go

    Hiya I'm not sure who to turn too untiol I go back to school and see a school councillor. Im over 99% sure that I have TS tics, and Ive had them since I was about 8years old (or younger) my mum has them in her hand but ive never told her what I have, she just assumes that I have habits which i can help, but I cant help doing what I do, I have motor and vocal tics which I cant help. and I dunno where to go for help...im 16years old..please someone help?
    ~ Amanda ~

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto, North York
    Posts
    3

    Default Amanda

    Hi Amanda, I'm sorry to hear you're feeling isolated and alone. I'm a 26 year old male in Vancouver, Canada. If you're in Great Britain though, there's undoubtedly resources within a few hours, perhaps more so than is the case in many areas of North America - but I know that doesn't help when you don't know how to make contact, or explain something that may make you uncomfortable, something you have no control over.

    Well, here's the UK site for tourettes http://www.tsa.org.uk/ I noticed they have a forum on there, I'm not sure if it's to talk with others, you can ask UK specialists questions about your situation.

    You say you're quite certain you have Tourette's; I actually have a mild case of Tourettes but a severe case of some of the accompanying conditions. My specialist told me that my tourettes was significant in that it is a important 'neurobiological marker' in trying to determine what kind of OCD, (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). I just say this, because he said that OCD with tourette's is considered by some to be quite different than OCD without tourettes.

    Anyway as far as the movements, I remember not wanting to get out of bed, and being so mad at God and the world for my condition. A friend asked me if focussing on that helped, and I had to admit it didn't. What did help was understanding from the community, there's actually a surgeon here in British Columbia who has Tourettes, he's just retired now, but he had both OCD and TS, yet functioned as a Surgeon admist his involuntary movements and OCD. He says that when he's involved in something demands his attention, he 'knows' he'll be able to control the tics, but sometimes, he feels that the physical tension is building up and he has to just step back, and do a tic. He is able to do things that 'mask his condition, like adjusting his gloves, or straightening his gown. Unfortunately not all people are so fortunate, like myself, I had to purposely do things to embarass myself to satisfy the Tourettes/Compulsion, but I don't think that was Tourettes. The message is just that as hard as it is to get excited about doing something when you feel like a social abberation, and are really mad at life, when people with TS do get involved in something that occupies them, often they find the tics decrease. With some kinds of tourettes it can be helpful to keep busy, even though you might feel like crawling underground and disappearing. Just do easy things that don't stress you out, but give you a sense of accomplishment.

    Have you tried any medication, they can be a little troublesome, but helpful for some people. Usually they can cause fatigue, and make your head a little cloudy, but it depends on the person, sometimes it goes away. At any rate, Tourettes seems to be best treated by a neurologist,, or a neuropsychiatrist. TS drugs include Tetrabenazine, (I first got that from England when i was sick ten years ago), Clonodine and others. If you need referral to a good doctor in the U.K., I would encourage you to ask myself or someone else to see if they knew anyone, I don't unfortunately, but I do know wait lists are usually long in Canada for many specialists, and certainly neurologists I wanted to contact in B.C.. So the sooner the better. God bless you, I hope the UK board helps.

    Ben

  3. #3

    Default Thank you for your reply ^_^

    Hey Ben thanks alot for your reply it has helped me knowing that there are others like me out there and Im going to check out that website you suggested soon, so thank you
    Im sorry to hear about the waiuting list issue, although I think there are waiting lists everywhere as Touretts and OCD becomes more of a well established syndrome.
    I think I have OCD too as I have obsessive thoughts about death and my family being hurt and I have to do certain things which would then make sure nothing bad would happen to them
    sadly mine arent that easy to hide, and my family tell my off for doing it even though I tell them I can't help it they think tis just a 'habit' that will go away
    When I found out about what I might have (but im pretty sure) I immediatly thought I wouldn't be able to have a good career so thanks for eling me about the surgeon who had both OCD and tourettes because it does give some hope to those with them.
    I don't think Id want to take mediacation, im focusing more on trying to help my tics and im still at school so it does intefere with my learning and I can't concentrate as much. They do subside when Im concentrating on certain things which is good, but when there is quiet room and everyone is silent its very hard to stop them sadly.
    Did you find that medication helps you?
    Anyway speak again and thank you very much from the bottom of my heart :D
    Speak soon ~ Amanda ~

  4. #4

    Default to amanda

    Amanda I just saw your reply and wanted to let you know that Tourette's is not an end to your dreams for the future. Many many people with Tourette's succeed in life. Like you I was diagnosed in my teens and went through a tortous time. But I can tell you that I am now 32 and very much happy with life and I even still have a few tics.
    My teen years were a challenge, I was out of high school for two years because of symptoms. I got back to school, finished high school, went to univesity. Travelled the world. Obtained a masters degree and now crazy enough I am in my 3 rd year of Medical School. So don't let the diagnosis of Tourette's curb your dreams. It is just a "label" to explain why you do certain things. The world is yours for the taking. You don't have to be a doctor, scientist, lawyer or go to university to be successful. Happiness is success in itself.
    Take Care
    Tabbi

  5. #5

    Default im not from Canada but I don't know where else to go...:(

    Hey Amanda
    I can sympathise so much with your problems, for years my parents kept bothering/yelling at me to stop my Vocal tics, and what was i so nervous about.
    I just had a conversation with my mother tonight, telling her i believe i have tourette's, to which i think she's trying to cope with now.

    And don't worry about career problems, i work in a busy cafe at the front-of-house, which has to be the most public of places. So try not to think that you'll have to hide away or anything.
    Good luck finding info in the UK

  6. #6

    Default im not from Canada but I don't know where else to go...:(

    To Amanda. I'd like to tell you that my son-in-law has Tourettes and only had it diagnosed after my grandson started tics 2 years ago and he had to complete some questionnaires. His parents didn't want to recognise that he had a problem and felt that he just wasn't trying hard enough. When I first met him, we assumed he was 'nervous' after noticing his grimaces and twitches. Besides being one of the most energetic and helpful people we know, he is a manager with over 300 people reporting to him, so having Tourettes isn't the end of your career dreams. My grandson couldn't read a year ago and certainly couldn't write, but now he can do both at a level just below his peers, which is most gratifying. My son-in-law went to University and because of having Tourettes has excelled in all types of sports as well as being an expert furniture maker and carpenter. There isn't anything he can't build. All these things are due to his having to be busy to control his tics, but it's a very positive side effect which has benefitted him throughout life. There are professionals in all categories who suffer from Tourettes, so you can be anything you want. I wish you well in your search for help and understanding.
    Yours in friendship
    Bella
    Bella

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,820

    Default im not from Canada but I don't know where else to go...:(

    Bella,

    Thank you for sharing a beautiful story about your family!

    Tourette does not have to be a handicap, and a person afflicted with the disorder and excel in just about any field they choose.

    There might be obstacles or challenges while dealing with the disorder, but with love and support along with positive re enforcement, just about anything is possible.

    Hope you decide to make the TSFC Forum part of your regular online activities.

  8. #8

    Default im not from Canada but I don't know where else to go...:(

    hi amanda,
    where abouts are you?if you are in the uk then join
    http://www.tsa.org.uk/

    i am a member of the TSA(UK) there is a forum there which you can join in and talk to others like you and maybe get some help and advice from the online doctor there

    good luck

    and no,TS isnt life -ending.....just a different way of life
    jo

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: September 9, 2007, 05:28 PM
  2. AntiDepressants Warning in Pregnancy-Health Canada
    By Steve in forum Diagnosis and Treatment of Tourette Syndrome
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May 15, 2007, 06:00 PM
  3. Turkey Day 2007 in Canada
    By Steve in forum Across The Fence
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 6, 2006, 12:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •