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Thread: ScullCap Tea

  1. #1

    Default ScullCap Tea

    Just food for thought. If any 1 has a problem to just relax and unwind or just sleep, witch I do, I found drinking scull cap tea help 2 relax. You can read up on it just go 2 google and type in scullcap tea. I find it does relax me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default ScullCap Tea

    Greg,

    Scullcap tea appears to be a variety of mint tea. Mint is used a a digestve after large meals because it acts to relax and aid in digestion.

    Herbal teas and tisane's may have some beneficial effects, as long as their cost is not prohibitive as less expensive versions sold in supermarkets might produce similar effects.

    In reading one of the sites selling this product, I read the following statemt:

    >>>Scullcap Tea eases premenstrual tension, strengthens the brain, and treats epilepsy, hysteria and treating seizure.<<

    This kind of absurd hyperbole makes me very suspicious because these people have no obligation to prove anything they claim.

    I agree with you Greg, that a person with TS needs to find a sensible and effective method of inducing relaxation. We just have to be cautions about well informed about our choices.

  3. #3

    Default Hi Steve

    Hi Steve. The tea that i drink is not a mint tea, and the lady that I have pick it up 4 me picks it up from where she buys her homapasic remedies. As i was saying it helps me to relax. ME. The tea I get comes not in a tea bag but loose, I get a full bag of loose tea for $ 4 and yes theres all diferent kinds of scullcap tea, thats why READ be-4 you buy and make sure it's the proper one. I wasnt saying 4 people to buy the tea, I was just saying that it helps me, and it was just a THOUGHT. and it might help some 1 else to relax. Thats why i posded it. it was just a SUGESTION.

  4. #4
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    Default ScullCap Tea

    Greg,

    Absolutely right about reading before buying! I would add, understanding what the substance does, based on your own research and not based on what the salesperson tells you, is also in your best interest.

    I know you were not promoting the product and your posting is appreciated. I was responding with my own perspective.

    We know that the body is an ongoing electro-chemical process. Anything that is consumed, whether it's food, medicine, herbs or water contributes to and/or alters this process.

    When two or more substances are combined, sometimes their combined action together is different from the action of each individual compound or substance.

    It's important to understand these interactions because for people taking medications, even though substances claim to be natural, or homeopathic remedies, they are still chemicals and many do interact with prescribed or over the counter medications.

    I admit I don't know much about skullcap tea, but after reading some of the sites following my search, I felt they resembled snake oil sellers containing exaggerated claims for efficacy and medically sounding half truths.

    If it works for you and you don't experience any adverse effects, it's great. However if one is taking any medication, it would be prudent to discuss the use of any of these substances with ones physician or pharmacist.

    There are also some scientifically based drug interaction sites on the internet.

  5. #5

    Default ScullCap Tea

    You know Steve, there is a lot of bad science out there. Just because somebody calls himself a scientist and says his methods are based on science doesn't necessarily mean that it's sound science. I am just as sceptical of so-called scientific sites as ones that seem like quack ones. I research everything, including what my doctor tells me.

    My medical doctor once prescribed something to me when I was pregnant that could have been harmful to the baby. Fortunately, before I had the prescription filled, I asked the pharmacist to let me read what it says about the drug in HIS pharmacist book (the patient information never gives all the relevant information and tends to downplay side effects, because the pharmaceutical companies want you to take their stuff). When I read that pregnant women shouldn't take it, I didn't get it.

    My doctor apologized to me when I told her (yes, there are actually doctors who admit making mistakes), being glad I do my own homework and don't act like doctors are God.

    On the other side of the coin a so-called naturopathic practitioner (who owns a health food store in my town) made me very ill with poor advice a few weeks ago, making me so sick that I spent three weeks in bed. I got better by consulting a homeopath, and I am in her care now.

    The difference is, that anybody who's taken a weekend course can call themselves 'Certified Natural Practitioner' (unfortunately I didn't realize that before I listened to her), even if they don't know what the heck they are doing. On the other hand, homeopaths have to go to college for at least four years to get their degree.

    So, I say, beware of ANY kind of medical advice, from your MD to naturopaths (a lot of whom are excellent), health food store owners etc. Do your own research and make your own decisions, think for yourself. It's dangerous to let others do your thinking for you, and making your decisions for you.
    German citizen, married to a Canadian for 28 years, four daughters, one son, eight grandchildren (and one on the way).

  6. #6

    Default ScullCap Tea

    Hi Greg and Steve

    I've used skullcap b4 to help me relax as well as other herbs. I like trying different kinds as they r healthy and taste good too. Having a pot of tisane simmering on the stove allows me to grab a relaxing drink whenever I want but now that summers here I havnt been doing it as much lately. Skullcap is a nervine meaning it has an affect on the nerves. Herbs have been used for millennia and their uses r well observed and researched.

    Herbalists train for yrs and in their eyes the pharmaceutical industry may look like a 'snake oil' business as it does in mine but thats just my 2 cents worth :roll: .

    Good health 8)

  7. #7

    Default ScullCap Tea

    Hi Uschi I guess we were both writing our posts at the same time and u finished first. I didnt see urz b4 I wrote mine so I was just responding to Steve and Greg.

    I just want to say that I agree with u totally about the Rx industry and about reading up fully on prescriptions. Unfortunately any kind of doc or health practitioner can give bad advice. Are u sure that this health food store owner is a naturopath becuz a naturopath is an actual doctor who has to take specific courses for 4 or 5 yrs to become a Doctor of Naturopathy. Homeopathy is also a large part of the curriculum when becoming a naturopath.

    I buy organic food when I can and support health food stores but I'm the first to say that a lot of these health food store owners r just in it for the money as these stores r making a small fortune nowadays especially with their pills and powders. Whether its chemical or natural, pills r a multi billion dollar industry. Sometimes I get frustrated at how expensive and difficult it is to eat pure healthy foods :? .

  8. #8

    Default ScullCap Tea

    Scott, I have her card, on which it says that she is a certified naturopathic health practitioner, who does hair analysis, nutritional counseling and several others. She messed me up by selling me a bowel and parasite cleanse that made me extremely ill, with diarrhea for three weeks. There are different kinds of cleanses, and one that is right for one person can be totally wrong for the next, you have to be very careful there. I was being ignorant in wanting to do it on my own, but thought I could trust this lady's advice.

    I ended up in the hospital a week after I started the cleanse, thinking I was having a heart attack. After a lot of testing, they declared that I had extremely bad bowel and stomach cramps, and that my heart was fine. I was also low on electrolytes (no wonder) and potassium. They didn't do anything at the hospital to fix those imbalances and sent me home.

    That was Monday night (May 30th). On the Wednesday I managed to drag myself to the health food store, and asked for something to fix my electrolytes. She just looked at me with a blank look, and dumbly said, "Electrolytes?" She does nutritional counseling, but doesn't know what electrolytes are. I couldn't believe it. She had no idea how to fix my problems.

    Anyway, I have also found that a lot of health food store owners are very knowledgable and have given me excellent advice. And I have gone to other naturopaths as well, and they certainly knew what they were doing.

    Unfortunately, as my homeopath said, somebody can call themselves a naturopathic practitioner after taking a weekend course. Those are the people that make real naturopaths look bad when they are as ignorant as this lady.

    In the meantime I have heard other horror stories about her from people I have told my story to. One of these days she is going to kill somebody with her bad advice.
    German citizen, married to a Canadian for 28 years, four daughters, one son, eight grandchildren (and one on the way).

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default ScullCap Tea

    No doubt that each of us must take charge of our own health care, and research everything that is proposed to us for our health care, whenever possible.

    If you are lying on a stretcher in Emergency having lost three units of blood, you're hardly in a position to surf the internet looking for a second opinion.

    the pharmacist to let me read what it says about the drug in HIS pharmacist book (the patient information never gives all the relevant information and tends to downplay side effects, because the pharmaceutical companies want you to take their stuff).
    Pharmacists and physicians in Canada all use the Compendium of Pharmaceutical Specialties (referred to as the CPS), published annually in English and French.

    The CPS contains the product monographs for each approved prescription medication available in Canada, as well as various cross reference and drug identification information. There is nothing secretive in the CPS.

    Product monographs are now available on the websites of all pharmaceutical manufacturers, usually having to follow the links to "Physicians' Information" Monographs can be downloaded as .pdf files.

    Reading and understanding a product monograph requires some understanding of pharmacology and statistics, but the information is readily available.

    Sometimes the monograph will contain directives in connection with drug/drug or drug/food interactions. If it does not, further research should be done to determine if any interactions exist with medications you currently use.

    The patient information sheet is not designed by the drug manufacturer, but by the Health Protection Branch (HPB) of Health Canada. The information it contains is a synopsis of what the HPB considers the most relevant patient information, to be supplemented by your physician, pharmacist or your own research.

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