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Thread: Botox

  1. #1

    Default Botox

    Has anyone used botox for vocal tics. If so, how helpful was it. :?:

  2. #2
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    To date we have not received a first hand report about someone's experience with Botox therapy.

    Here's a news report:

    Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston are using botulinum toxin type A (Botox) to treat the neurological disorder, which can cause involuntary motor and vocal tics. Joseph Jankovic, MD, professor of neurology and director of the Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic at BCM, was the lead author of a recent article in the journal Clinical Pharmacology, which showed that Botox can suppress tics in disorders like Tourette's.

    "While we have an enormous amount of data showing that Botox is an extremely safe and effective treatment for a variety of therapeutic and cosmetic uses, the important thing for patients is whether this translates into meaningful improvements in their daily lives," Jankovic said. "Our review makes clear that treatment with Botox accomplishes this across a wide range of chronic and debilitating disorders and conditions."

    Although public awareness about Tourette's has generally improved since medieval times -- when it was thought to be demonic possession -- the disorder remains largely elusive to researchers and greatly misunderstood by the masses.

    "We still don't know exactly what causes Tourette's syndrome, but we do know that it is a genetic disorder," Jankovic said.

    Unlike most genetic disorders, Tourette's is caused by bilineal transmission, a rare event in which both parents contribute defective genes to their child. Nevertheless, the rate of Tourette's syndrome remains relatively stable -- roughly 3 percent of the population carries some form of the disorder, according to Jankovic.

    "We have made tremendous progress with treatments, and even though we don't know the cause of the disease, we are able to significantly improve the quality of life for patients with Tourette's syndrome by a variety of medications," he said.

    A common misperception of Tourette's is that coprolalia, the involuntary utterance of obscenities, is the predominant symptom, when actually less than half of all patients exhibit it. Furthermore, most people with Tourette's develop other behavioral problems such as attention deficit disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    In addition to Botox, medications like fluphenazine, pimozide and risperidol, which block dopamine receptors, suppress involuntary movements. Jankovic is also conducting studies with other drugs including tetrabenazine, an investigational drug that depletes dopamine, and topiramate, an anti-epileptic drug. Finally, new surgical procedures developed at BCM and The Methodist Hospital hold promise for curbing uncontrollable tics and other neurological problems associated with Tourette's.

    "Tourette's clearly deserves more attention than it has been paid by either the scientific community or the funding agencies," Jankovic said. "For every patient we diagnose in our clinic, there are probably dozens who suffer the consequences of Tourette's syndrome without knowing that they have it."

    [size=9px]Source: Baylor Medical College, Houston, Texas[/size]

  3. #3
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    Default Botox

    In my opinion (not a Doc) Botox can not impact most typical vocal tics.

    1. Using Botox on "vocal" tics that involve the diaphragm (e.g.: sniffling) scares me. How can you freeze the diaphragm without doing other damage? Breathing is kind of important - tics or no.

    2. Using Botox on "verbal" tics that involve language is the "wrong tool for the wrong job". Coprolalia is not a tic. It is an OCD symptom. Botox can not change nerve signals to the Wernicke (language) and Broca (speech) processing centers in your brain. At least I hope not. Ha ha.

    Now I have to admit that the range of possible 'vocal' tics is nigh-infinite, so this might only cover 80% of them. I use my "80% Rule" here on purpose - the exact percentage is not important. I am open to the idea that Botox could stop certain kinds of muscle movements that create vocal or nasal tics. But would that turn off the impulse that includes the diaphragm? Sniffling is not just a nose twitch. Coughing is not, either.

    Personally, no one will ever get within 20 miles of me with a Botox injection. If tics are damaging my body over time, I can only imagine what turning off the whole system for a short time will do to whatever is actually causing the tics. (Smells like nicotine and Haldol to me.) No one has ever suggested, that I am aware of, that tics are the primary symptom. Tics are the body's reaction to something else. I am sure of it. I get a visceral response from the Botox idea - like having a Latin teacher who yelled at me when I twitched. Oh, I sat still in his class, but I paid for it later.
    Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
    http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

  4. #4
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    Default Botox

    Botox is injected into muscle tissue and causes a localized reduction in muscle activity.

    Botox indeed can be effective, but only in specific cases according to Dr. C.J. Malanga, professor of neurology in the school of medicine at Uiversity of North Carolina.

    ?Some kids have tics that are so violent, so strong and so repetitive, they can actually do themselves an injury,? he said. ?If it?s one tic in one part of the body, Botox is a very effective treatment.?

    source: Daily Tarheel

  5. #5

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    I saw a medical tv show on TS a while back and a doctor over in europe is using botx to treat TS but he said it was sort of a dangerous procedure to due. But the man recieving it said his vocal tics were more calm.
    The other day at a local grocery store, I saw a rack with books on it and one of them said, "pregancy for dummies"............

  6. #6
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    Adam this sounds like a false-positive. My first ADHD drug was an antidepressant. A month later, I had the worst depression of my life. The drug was working, and for the first time in my life, I saw the world around me, and it was depressing.

    I would hope that we can now all agree that anxiety makes tics worse. And therefore, less anxiety can reduce tic symptoms. So maybe, this guy's tics got better because he was less stressed because he was being treated for his tics. So maybe the vocal tics got better indirectly.

    Just my first thought.
    Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
    http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

  7. #7

    Default Botox

    Hello,

    My son is 14 and he just underwent our 2nd round of botox injections for vocal tics. In our case, it has been successful.

  8. #8
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    Welcome sbowen!

    Thanks for sharing your experience. Would you elaborate on the rationale that led your son to treatment with Botox.

    Did your son experience any adverse reactions with this treatment?

    Looking forward to your continued participation in the Forum. Glad you've joined us.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default Botox

    sbowen, don't let the Tiger claw at you. I don't mean nuffin' by it. :-)

    However, if you don't mind, could you describe the vocal tics that were treated by the Botox. I am curious as to the details (see my earlier posting in this thread for some of the motivation).

    Thanks in advance!

    ps: hey, if it works, and it don't do permanent damage, then I'll give it a fair shake
    Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
    http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

  10. #10
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    FWIW there was a report on Discovery Health the other night about Botox being successful in the treatment of Cervical Dystonia.

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that causes stiffening of certain muscle groups and is believed to have its origins in the same part of the brain where other movement disorder have their origin, such as Tourette.

    Dystonia: Involuntary movements and prolonged muscle contraction, resulting in twisting body motions, tremor, and abnormal posture. These movements may involve the entire body, or only an isolated area.

    Symptoms may even be "task specific," such as writer's cramp. Dystonia can be inherited, occur sporadically without any genetic pattern, or be associated with medications or diseases (for example, a specific form of lung cancer).

    The gene responsible for at least one form of dystonia has recently been identified. Some types of dystonia respond to dopamine, or can be controlled with sedative-type medications, or surgery.

    The apparent success of Botox in treating Dystonia does not imply effectiveness in treating Tourette necessarily, but is interesting, nevertheless.

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