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Thread: Your Partner

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Age
    45
    Posts
    227

    Question Your Partner

    For those who have partner, how do they respond or cope with your medical issues?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Paradise, NL
    Age
    36
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Your Partner

    Hi SpiderThug,

    I'm just wondering what you mean by medial issues? I have mild TS, so I'm not on medication right now.

    My husband has been well education about TS and all of its associated disorders. We even joke that he's an undiagnosed case of ADHD and OCD waiting to happen.

    If you're mainly looking for the medical side of TS and how a partner reacts, I'm not sure if I can provide much help. But let me know more of what you're thinking and I'll check back later.

    Thanks and take care!
    Virginia
    Newfoundland Labrador Chapter - Secretary
    @VMiddleton - virginiamiddleton.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Age
    45
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Your Partner

    Thankyou for your response. I am coming from how they cope with medical issues that you have. Are they open minded and accepting, are they in denial, etc?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Paradise, NL
    Age
    36
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Your Partner

    Hmm, I don't know if I'll be of much help. My TS is very mild, so I'm not on medication right now (I have self medicated Melatonine at night sometimes, but not for a long period of time).

    I'm pretty lucky in that my husband was very understanding about my TS when we first started going out. He asked lots of questions and read up on the disorder and has attended some of the TSFC national conferences with me.

    He's really supportive and when he notices my tics are more pronounced (a good indicator is a vocal tic I have that waxes and wanes), he'll ask me if I'm stressed or upset about something to see if he can help.

    I don't know if you're in a relationship right now, but if you are, then I've always found being open and honest about how you're feeling and what's going on in your head is the best way to start a conversation like that.
    And even if you're not in a relationship, it's important to remember that the right person will be understanding and want to know more information because your TS is a part of you, so the person is learning more about you when talking about your TS.

    I hope this helps and let me know if you want to talk about this more.
    Newfoundland Labrador Chapter - Secretary
    @VMiddleton - virginiamiddleton.ca

  5. #5

    Default Re: Your Partner

    Hi guys, im new here, i know my reply is way too late in this thread. anyhow im just browsing here and learning a lot about TS.

    My husband has the disorder, we have been together for almost 7 years, i totally understand his condition. In the medical aspect, aside for the catapres med he use for TS i think proper education is the best way to approach it. learning and understanding that it is also triggered by stress and tension from situation, things and events is one way to give better understanding of the behavior.

    Follow up questions, does anyone here knows what are the chances of a child to get TS if a parent has the disorder? Me and my husband is planning to have a baby next year.

    hope to hear from u guys, thanks!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Your Partner

    .. Karleon!

    Commendations on your support and understanding for your husband!

    Here are some insights to your question about Tourette genetics:

    How common is Tourette syndrome?
    Tourette syndrome is a relatively common disorder. Although its exact incidence is uncertain, it is estimated to affect 1 to 10 in 1,000 children. This disorder occurs in populations and ethnic groups worldwide, and it is more common in males than in females.

    What genes are related to Tourette syndrome?
    A variety of genetic and environmental factors likely play a role in causing Tourette syndrome. Most of these factors are unknown, and researchers are studying risk factors before and after birth that may contribute to this complex disorder. Scientists believe that tics may result from changes in brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) that are responsible for producing and controlling voluntary movements.

    Mutations involving the SLITRK1 gene have been identified in a small number of people with Tourette syndrome. This gene provides instructions for making a protein that is active in the brain. The SLITRK1 protein probably plays a role in the development of nerve cells, including the growth of specialized extensions (axons and dendrites) that allow each nerve cell to communicate with nearby cells. It is unclear how mutations in the SLITRK1 gene can lead to this disorder.

    Most people with Tourette syndrome do not have a mutation in the SLITRK1 gene. Because mutations have been reported in so few people with this condition, the association of the SLITRK1 gene with this disorder has not been confirmed. Researchers suspect that changes in other genes, which have not been identified, are also associated with Tourette syndrome.

    Read more about the SLITRK1 gene.

    How do people inherit Tourette syndrome?
    The inheritance pattern of Tourette syndrome is unclear. Although the features of this condition can cluster in families, many genetic and environmental factors are likely to be involved. Among family members of an affected person, it is difficult to predict who else may be at risk of developing the condition.

    Tourette syndrome was previously thought to have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, which suggests that one mutated copy of a gene in each cell would be sufficient to cause the condition. Several decades of research have shown that this is not the case. Almost all cases of Tourette syndrome probably result from a variety of genetic and environmental factors, not changes in a single gene.
    Source: Genetics Home Reference: Tourette Syndrome/ U.S. National Library of Medicine

  7. #7

    Default Re: Your Partner

    thanks steve for the info, it somehow eases my curiosity, i appreciate that.

    Id love to hear from some parents who have a child with TS if you guys have found a link from your relative or ancestors who have the same disorder. and if there is a pattern of getting the rare gene in the family. thanks!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Your Partner

    The diagnosis of Tourette in your husband should not hinder your plans for a family. You may wish to speak to your husband's neurologist for a professional opinion, but there is likely no need for concern.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Georgia Chapter of the TSFC
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: Your Partner

    SpiderThug: I've been "lucky" in that I keep hooking up with women with neurology of their own. Ha ha ha. I intend to write my 2nd book about TS on the adult experience, which means a whole slew of chapters about relationships.

    As for having kids, two things: 1. Adoptable population has MORE TS+ then the general population. 2. If I introduced you to my TS+ 10-year old daughter, you would likely not be too concerned any more. She settled the genetics debate for me.
    Darin M. Bush, The Tourette Tiger, author of "Tiger Trails"
    http://www.facebook.com/tourettetiger

  10. #10

    Default Re: Your Partner

    Dear Karleon28:

    We have not been able to find a genetic link for Tourette in the family yet our 13 year old son has it.

    Jenny

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