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Thread: Pain underestimated by doctors for some patients

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    753

    Default Pain underestimated by doctors for some patients

    From a CBC news release today:

    A University of Northern B.C. professor who is studying the impact of the clinician-patient relationship on how health professionals rate pain suggests it decreases if the clinician doesn't like the patient.

    It means people with invisible pain such as bad backs, as opposed to broken legs may not get adequate treatment for the problem if the doctor disregards their feelings, he said.

    "A good case can be made that is going to demoralize patients and contribute to very testy patient-professional relationships," Prkachin said.
    "What we're trying to do is understand what's going on there and how to change that."
    From the calls we get at the TSFC office, the patient/clinician relationship is a tricky one.
    It's so important that your clinician likes you and wants to give you good care.
    Please remember that relationships are two-sided, and you have to give a little to get something back.

    I always try to bring a bit of sunshine into the room when I meet with my specialists - if it's joke, or a picture of how my little girl is growing up.
    It lightens the mood in the room, sweetens the specialist up, and then I gently list the things I need help with.
    Even doctors need a little sugar to make the nasty stuff go down.
    Tina, Forum Moderator, TSFC Staff Liaison

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,945

    Default Re: Pain underestimated by doctors for some patients

    Interesting perspective, since physicians are expected to be objective in their assesment and treatment of patients.

    On the other side of the coin, I would expect a certain amount of time might be required to form a patient / doctor bond where the doctor at the very least remembers you when you come through the door and may remember a few details of you history from memory.

    How long do you think such a relationship might take, given the difficulty in locating a permanent doctor in the first place and then the rapidity of the visit?

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