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Thread: Difficulty With Employment

  1. #1

    Talking Difficulty With Employment

    Thank you for information.

    I managed to get over from the depressive effects of the syndrome, but now I face quite a problem... I'm 25years old and I can not find work because the employers reject me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,941

    Default Re: Hello...

    I'm 25years old and I can not find work because the employers reject me.
    Perhaps we could discuss your situation in detail here on the Forum, and try to figure out some ways that you might be able to overcome the concerns of potential employers.

    Would you be interested in having such a discussion, Ionut?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hello...

    Yes. Why not. I'll be interested in having such a discussion.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,941

    Default Re: Difficulty With Employment

    Ionut,

    Would you describe the extent of your Tourette symptoms, when you go to an interview with a prospective employer.

    Also, what are your symptoms like when you might be among other people..for example while you were at your studies, with your classmates.

    How many times would you have been rejected for employment, and did the employers specifically say it was because of your tics?

    Is there any law in your Country to prevent discrimination for employment due to physical limitations?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Difficulty With Employment

    My syndrome is manifested by facial gestures and sounds from my neck. When I go to the interview with the employer my tics are amplified because the stress... and all the employers say that I will be called ...but no answer. I was hired for a month but I was fired... they said that I'm not for that post, they searching for someone else. Half of the employers that I met they told my that is a problem with my medical records and they will think and I will get an answer in 1-2 weeks... but no answer. In about two years I was at 15-20 employers.

    Romania is a country with many political interests, there are laws to prevent discrimination for employment but nobody seems to want to help us... laws are violated every day. I was even at the "Forces for Work"( is the institution that if you are unemployed is searching for you to work ) and I let them a CV... as usual no answer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,941

    Default Re: Difficulty With Employment

    Ionut,

    You sond like a person with a positive attitude, and this should be your strongest quality to help you find a job.

    It sounds like a reason you may be experiencing difficulty is because of a lack of awareness in the employers you are seeing, or perhaps social attitudes about physical and vocal tics.

    I don't know what it's like in your Country, but many employers still find accepting and accommodating wheelchair users and people with hearing impairments easier than understanding Tourette . Too many still think tics are “bad habits,” symptoms of nervousness, or deliberate behavior.

    The idiotic and insulting images of people with TS presented in the media don’t help.

    This means that your first hurdle is educating employers and coworkers.

    When arranging your interview, when speaking to the prospective employer on the telephone or by email, before the actual interview, you need to tell the person at that time about your Tourette. You need to explain that Tourette is a neurological disorder that does not affect your ability to do the work.

    What is important is that the prospective employer is not surprised in your first interview by your tic activity, so by letting him/her know before the interview, they will be prepared and will not be surprised.

    We have a number of brochures you can download, print and translate to give to prospective employers to explain what is Tourette Syndrome.

    Do you have working skills or skills you developed in school that would be of interest in the line of work you would like?

    What kind of work are you looking for?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    749

    Default Re: Difficulty With Employment

    Hi Ionut,

    It can be challenging to get a job when your tics are visible in an interview setting.
    One advantage you can give yourself is to look for jobs at bigger companies that have policies around accommodating disabilities.
    They would have these policies posted on their web-site. In Canada, these are often companies that sponsor Paralympic and Special Olympics athletes. Take a look at the web-sites for your national teams and see who their sponsors are.

    There are also programs in Canada that help people train through apprenticeships and job placements and offer job shadowing for the start of the position to aid in communications between the employee and employer around accommodations. I don't know if these might exist in your country, but the "Forces at Work" office should be able to help you.

    Finally, your positive attitude is a key. You might want to look for work that is not advertised. Often opportunities can be found by volunteering in your field of choice. The volunteer positions would give you a chance to build up your resume, and might introduce to people and opportunities that you might not have access to otherwise.

    On the lighter side, there is this story about a Super Intern who landed 47 job offers (and one job) after a 112-day speed interning spree. Sounds a bit extreme to me, and I hope you don't have to try so hard to get a job, but as the Super Intern says: "I really hope that this journey inspires other students to not limit themselves."

    Good luck, Tina
    Tina, Forum Moderator, TSFC Staff Liaison

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