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Thread: RETHINKING DEPRESSION on CBC Radio's Ideas

  1. #1
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    Default RETHINKING DEPRESSION on CBC Radio's Ideas

    Hi everyone,
    CBC Radio just announced a three-part series on Depression to air over March.
    I don't believe they will have pod-casts available until the pieces air, however I found this information on the Ideas website.
    In their on-line promos for the series, the CBC refers to depression stats and calls it an epidemic, and on the rise since drugs became available to treat them.
    These stats aren't on the web-site so I can't add them to this post. However, I will add links to more information as it becomes available.
    As stated below, the first episode of this series "explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant."

    Thursday, March 7
    RETHINKING DEPRESSION, Part 1
    Depression. It has been called the mean reds. The blue devils. The black dog. And through history, treatments for depression have varied wildly. In the Middle Ages, depressives were caged in asylums. In Victorian England, wealthier patients were sent to seaside resorts for a change of air. In 1938, electroshock therapy was used. No wonder then, when the Age of the Antidepressant arrived, it was considered a triumph for psychiatry. Prozac came onto the market in 1987, followed quickly by many similar drugs. And since then, the number of people afflicted with depression has soared. However, in recent years, the antidepressant has come under siege. It is ineffective, even dangerous, some psychiatrists and patients now say, claiming it is not the panacea we thought it would be.

    In this 3 part program, Rethinking Depression, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant.
    Part 2 airs Thursday, March 14; Part 2 airs March 21.
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    Default Re: RETHINKING DEPRESSION on CBC Radio's Ideas

    You can listen to the first part of this documentary series on the CBC Radio web-site.

    Rethinking Depression, Part 1

    Depression. It has been called the mean reds. The blue devils. The black dog. And through history, treatments for depression have varied wildly. In the Middle Ages, depressives were caged in asylums. In Victorian England, wealthier patients were sent to seaside resorts for a change of air. In the 1930's, procedures like lobotomies and electroconvulsive therapy were used. Psychiatry's tools were crude and limited. No wonder then, when the Age of the Antidepressant arrived, it was considered psychiatry's triumph. Prozac came onto the market in 1988, followed quickly by many similar drugs. But, since then, the number of people afflicted with depression has soared. In this 3 part program, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell explores the short and troubling history of the antidepressant. Part 2 airs Thursday, March 14; Part 3 airs Thursday, March 21.


    Participants in the Episode 1:

    Edward Shorter, Professor of the History of Medicine, Professor of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. He is the author of numerous books including, How Everyone Became Depressed. Toronto.

    Charles Barber, Director of The Connection Institute for Innovative Practice (dedicated to studying the narratives of people recovering from mental illness) and Lecturer in Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, author of two books on mental illness, Comfortably Numb and Songs from the Black Chair, Connecticut.

    Peter D. Kramer, is a psychiatrist and author. He is the author of several books, including, Against Depression and Listening to Prozac, Rhode Island.

    Jordan Peterson, psychology professor, University of Toronto, author of Maps of Meaning: Architecture of Belief, Toronto.

    Miriam Greenspan, psychotherapist, author of Healing through the dark emotions, the wisdom of grief, fear and despair, Boston.

    Vera Hassner Sharav, president of the Alliance for Human Research Protection, agency that focuses on human rights protection in medical research.


    Related Websites:

    Chris Norris Words and Music - The Medicated Me
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    Default Re: RETHINKING DEPRESSION on CBC Radio's Ideas

    Rethinking Depression, Part 2

    Over the years, the descriptions have varied: melancholia, the Black Dog, down in the dumps. The term most used today is "depression". The World Health Organization says depression is set to become second only to heart disease as the world's leading disability by the year 2020. An alarming conclusion when you consider the history. One hundred years ago depression was thought to be extremely rare, with 1% of the population suffering. Today it's often called the common cold of mental illness. But just how effective are antidepressants in treating depression?

    Unpublished clinical trials have come to light and they reveal that the antidepressant was never the triumphant treatment many psychiatrists hoped it would be. And we're also learning that the theory that antidepressants restore serotonin in the brain could be false. However, despite this news about serotonin and sadness, the number of depressed people continues to grow. Now some researchers wonder whether the modern antidepressant has increased rates of depression instead of lowering them? In episode two of Rethinking Depression, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell examines the debate around antidepressants.

    Participants in the Episode 2:

    Irving Kirsch, psychology professor, University of Hull, author of The Emperor's New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth, Yorkshire, UK.
    .
    Charles Barber, Director of The Connection Institute for Innovative Practice (dedicated to studying the narratives of people recovering from mental illness) and Lecturer in Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, author of two books on mental illness, Comfortably Numb and Songs from the Black Chair, Connecticut.

    Jordan Peterson, psychology professor, University of Toronto, author of Maps of Meaning: Architecture of Belief, Toronto.

    Edward Shorter, Professor of the History of Medicine, Professor of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. He is the author of numerous books including, How Everyone Became Depressed, Toronto.

    Miriam Greenspan, psychotherapist, author of Healing through the dark emotions, the wisdom of grief, fear and despair, Boston.

    Robert Whitaker, science journalist, author of several books, including, Anatomy of an Epidemic, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    Paul Andrews, assistant professor of evolutionary psychology at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
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    Default Re: RETHINKING DEPRESSION on CBC Radio's Ideas

    Rethinking Depression, Part 3

    The World Health Organization says depression is set to become second only to heart disease as the world's leading disability by the year 2020. More recent research over the past decade tells us that antidepressants do not work very well, if at all, for mild or moderate depression. And in severe depression, antidepressants only work in a small number of cases.

    So how can those who suffer from depression receive effective treatment and even possibly recover? In the third hour of Rethinking Depression, IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell brings us the stories of the depressed who are on the path to wellness and the methods that can be used to get them there.

    Participants in the program:

    Dr. Sally Merry is an Associate Professor in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Auckland, New Zealand, Director of Werry Centre Research, headed a team to create SPARX, a computer fantasy game for adolescents with depression.

    Roger Yaworski, executive director of Loyola House: Spiritual Retreat and Jesuit Training Centre, Guelph Ontario.

    Sarah Elizabeth Brown, peer advocate at Howie the Harp, a peer-run agency that provides employment resources to people with psychiatric disabilities, New York City. Author of: The Nerve to be Raw, How I Ate My Way out of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Julia Churchill, musician, actor, community arts, working through depression, Ottawa and Toronto.

    Charles Barber, Director of The Connection Institute for Innovative Practice (dedicated to studying the narratives of people recovering from mental illness) and Lecturer in Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, author of two books on mental illness, Comfortably Numb and Songs from the Black Chair, Connecticut.

    Related Websites:

    Copeland Center for Wellness & Recovery

    Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of major depressive disorder

    Dealing with depression - Self-Help & Coping Tips to Overcome Depression

    Healing Through the Dark Emotions: The Wisdom of Grief, Fear, and Despair by Miriam Greenspan
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