Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Problems at school

  1. #1

    Default Problems at school

    My son has run away from school twice this year. Both times he told a substitute teacher he needed to use the washroom, and he went home. It was 0 degrees or colder and he had his inside clothes on.

    Once he walked out the front door, and then refused to go to school. I was at a conference, and his older brother went to go to school. The school staff went and got him.

    I went to parent teacher interviews and learned:

    He needs lots of support. It sounds to me like more support and accommodation than what a teacher with 31 students can give to him.

    His teacher thinks he has behavioural problems that stem from his home life ( he is running away from school to come home) and does not consider that he may refuse to participate for medical reasons.

    She is a very good experienced teacher that isn't getting the Tourette paradym. His doctor sent out the school team to educate her.

    I asked the principal about what else the school could do in the way of accommodation, and she is looking into transferring him to another school for a different program.

    Any ideas or thoughts about what I can do or ask for?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,939

    Default Re: Problems at school

    Momwith2boys,

    I do not have first hand experience dealing with schools, so I will defer to one of our moderator team or another Forum member to offer some insights.



    His teacher thinks he has behavioural problems that stem from his home life ( he is running away from school to come home) and does not consider that he may refuse to participate for medical reasons.

    She is a very good experienced teacher that isn't getting the Tourette paradym.
    Has your son been evaluated by a pediatric psychologist to determine the basis of his difficulties? I believe if your son's actions can be attributed to symptoms of a disorder, this would have to be made clear to school authorities, so that his special needs can be accommodated...if such accommodations are available in your community.

    It will be interesting to hear comments from those who can advise you more accurately

  3. #3

    Default Re: Problems at school

    One thing that came up was that he did not want to participate in a gym activity that involved 120 kids. She used very good strategies to get him to participate. I pointed out that he has absence seizures when he is overstimulated. I have seen him have them in large crowds of people. She implied that was not an excuse. I was appalled.

    ---------- Post Merged at 01:56 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 01:48 PM ----------

    Oh, and he has seen a psychologist associated with his doctor and the school psychologist. I was never told anything that would help to code him in school from them. He does have coding at school from assessments in previous years, when he was in more supported classrooms but I was told not enough funding to support him more now. He has Tourette's, OCD, epilepsy, anxiety, executive dysfunction, and diagnoses of gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    790

    Default Re: Problems at school

    In Ontario, there is a government mandated program for students with any sort of special needs within the school system called the The Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC).

    The Identification, Placement, and Review Committee

    Identifying the Needs of Exceptional Pupils
    Exceptional pupils are identified as such by an Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC). Upon receiving a written request from a student's parent(s)/guardian(s), the principal of the school must refer the student to an IPRC. The IPRC will decide whether the student is an exceptional pupil and, if so, what type of educational placement is appropriate. The principal may also, on written notice to the parent(s)/guardian(s), refer the student to an IPRC. The parent(s)/guardian(s), as well as a student who is sixteen years of age or older, have the right to attend the IPRC meeting and may request that the IPRC discuss potential programs that would meet the student's needs. On the basis of these discussions, the IPRC can recommend the special education programs and/or services that it considers to be appropriate for the student.

    The regulation governing the identification and placement of exceptional pupils directs the IPRC to consider the integration of exceptional pupils into regular classes. Before considering the option of placing a student in a special education class, the committee must first consider whether placement in a regular class, with appropriate special education programs and services, would meet the student's needs and be consistent with the parent's preferences. Where placement in a special education class is deemed most appropriate, the IPRC must provide written reasons for its decision.

    For students whose needs cannot be met entirely in the regular classroom, a range of placement options is available. These options include:

    • A regular class with indirect support where the student is placed in a regular class for the entire day, and the teacher receives specialized consultative services.
    • A regular class with resource assistance where the student is placed in a regular class for most or all of the day and receives specialized instruction, individually or in a small group, within the regular classroom from a qualified special education teacher.
    • A regular class with withdrawal assistance where the student is placed in a regular class and receives instruction outside the classroom, for less than 50 per cent of the school day, from a qualified special education teacher.
    • A special education class with partial integration where the student is placed by the IPRC in a special education class in which the student-teacher ratio conforms to Regulation 298, section 31, for at least 50 per cent of the school day, but is integrated with a regular class for at least one instructional period daily.
    • A full-time special education class where the student-teacher ratio conforms to Regulation 298, section 31, for the entire school day.


    The IPRC may also consider referring the student to a provincial committee for consideration of eligibility for admission to one of the Provincial Schools for blind, deaf or deaf-blind students, or to one of the Provincial Demonstration Schools for students with severe learning disabilities.

    See also: Highlights of Regulation 181/98
    A Parent’s Guide to the IPRC and IEP | LDAO

    iprc_guide.pdf

    Usually, accessing these programs is best done with the help of a doctor or psychologist who can outline what accomodations are needed.

    I assume that this should be similar in British Columbia.

    Some information:

    My Child's Special Needs - Government of British Columbia

    Special Education
    All Students
    All students should have equitable access to learning, opportunities for achievement, and the pursuit of excellence in all aspects of their educational programs.

    Purpose
    The purpose of Special Education is to enable the equitable participation of students with special needs in the educational system in British Columbia.

    Special Needs
    Students with special needs have disabilities of an intellectual, physical, sensory, emotional, or behavioural nature, or have a learning disability or have exceptional gifts or talents.

    Policy: Special Education Services: A Manual of Policies, Procedures and Guidelines

    Resources:Special Education Resource Documents

    Cross Government Initiatives: Inter-Ministry Protocols for the Provision of Support Services to Schools (PDF, 1.05MB)

    Inter-ministry protocols are intended to support and guide the co-ordinated delivery of effective-services to school-aged children.

    Children and Youth with Special Needs - A Framework for Action
    The CYSN Framework for Action is B.C.’s strategy to improve access, quality and coordination of services for children and youth with special needs and their families across the ministries of Education, Children and Family Development and Health Services.


    See also:

    Review of special education in British Columbia - FEAT

    Inclusion: always a journey, never a destination - report.pdf - this is a rather technical paper looking at the situation in BC

  5. #5

    Default Re: Problems at school

    Thank you for the information. I will try to get in contact with the school board to see if there is anything like that in Alberta.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    790

    Default Re: Problems at school

    Oh sorry... I thought you were in B.C. for some reason.

    There is similar legislation in Alberta. Check the Alberta government website for information:

    See:

    Alberta Education - Programming for Special Education

    Chapter 6 Selecting Accommodations.doc - accommodations.pdf (PDF file)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Paradise, NL
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Problems at school

    At this year's conference, several of the dads indicated that the IEP was vital to them, because it was a legal document and thus if they ran in to difficulties with individual administrators, they had something to work with.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    287

    Default Re: Problems at school

    How old is your son? Is this running away from school a new thing or has he done it from grade k?

    Was he a csection baby? New research suggest that the lack of healthy bacteria via the birth canal is leading to increased allergy, ibs and more. There is a link between the gut and the brain.
    Will your son eat any fresh organic veggies? What about probiotics? We swear by them. This world of super processed "kid" food is not populating the gut w/ the good stuff. Dark leafy greens is the best for them. Green tea is good w/ some honey. Get rid of the artificial food dyes and perservatives.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Problems at school

    Thank you everyone for all of the suggestions and support. I pushed and pushed and had him moved to a new school with more support. He now has one teacher and teaching assistant with 13 kids in his class. His prior class had one teacher with 31 kids. His IPP has not changed, but I believe the goals will actually be reached! He has been there 3 weeks and has not run away!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,939

    Default Re: Problems at school

    Thank you for the update report, MomW2Bs!

    A class of 13 compared to a class of 31 sounds like it's just the environment that might help your son thrive.

    Do keep us posted on his progress.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •