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Thread: Diet and Tics

  1. #1
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    Default Diet and Tics

    Son 13 just "officially" diagnosed with TS. Vocal tics and most physical tics typically facial. I just finished reading Dr Terry Wahls book "Wahls Protocol" and her experience with MS and diet change drastically lessened the severity of her symptoms and reduction in MS medications. Made me wonder if there could also be a correlation with TS (neurological?) symptoms.

    I have been keeping a food diary and DEFINITELY see an upswing in tics after consuming "sugars". I also have him on Magnesium/Calcium and B-Calm Vit supplements which have also seen great results or rather see an obvious upswing when he doesn't take the vitamins.

    Any other parents seen changes with diet changes?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    I think there's some kind of connection having to do with adrenaline. My son follows a low carb diet because he's insulin resistant (= pre-diabetic). I can say several things:
    - the diet is helpful for my son in many ways
    - he finds it tempting not to follow the diet
    - his dysinhibition and impulsivity make it easier to violate his diet -- even though he's on board with the diet in principle
    - when he impulsively buys something off his diet at school, not only does he feel yucky in the afternoon, he also goes through a lot of self-blame -- that's the OCD side of his TS.

    If you want to try low carb, here's a gentle way of getting started:
    - Discreetly give away any sweets in the house, also white rice, white pasta
    - Buy Rudy's whole wheat bread with Extra Fiber
    - Spend a little extra at the grocery store for a couple of weeks, loading up on ingredients for your son's favorite dishes involving meat, fish, poultry.
    - Serve lots of other kinds of protein, such as hummus, bean dip, cheese cubes with toothpicks, marinated and baked tofu cubes, eggs.
    - Cook red lentils in place of a normal starch dish at dinner
    - Make open-faced sandwiches for lunch (instead of two slices of bread)
    - Give your son crunchy raw vegetable snacks such as sugar snap peas, carrots, sliced bell pepper, celery (all of these would be eaten raw). This gives him more chewing action which is good for the sensory system, and slows down the digestion of the nearby meal. If you put something within reach while the child is concentrating on something like a beloved television program, the child will probably start munching without thinking much about it.
    - It works best if the whole family goes low-carb, at least in the beginning.

    We saw sugar cravings go waaay down with a low-carb diet, within a week or two.

    Please note, I do not restrict amounts of food, only certain food groups. However, it's best to accentuate the positive, as the song says, and just brag about the great piece of meat you found in the supermarket and how well it came out. (Instead of "you can't have this, you can't have that....)

    ---------- Post Merged on December 1, 2014 at 09:11 AM ---------- Previous Post was on November 30, 2014 at 11:50 PM ----------

    I should have said
    - the diet is helpful for my son in many ways, including concentration and focus

    In fact, some people choose a low-carb diet precisely for this reason, and not because they're diabetic or insulin-resistant.

    I forgot to explain the reasoning behind a low-carb diet. Many people are familiar with the "sugar high" and the "sugar low" that comes a little while later, and to prevent these from occurring, make a point of having some protein with the sugary food, and also use unrefined sugars and flours in their cooking. The low-carb diet is based on the observation that in the body, flours and other complex carbohydrates break down into simple sugars in the natural digestive process. In other words, people who are quite insulin resistant can get "sugar drunk" from overdosing on starches, without even eating any sugar.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    thanks for the info, and not much convincing needed here for low carb diet as I follow "wheat belly" way of eating as much as I can. 2 out of 4 ppl in my famiy wheat/gluten sensitive. Trying to convert the other 2 (it's a struggle) one of them being my TS teenager. If I can show him correlation with his sugar/carb eating and tics is helpful.
    Thank you for the tips

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    I'm not familiar with "wheat belly."

    At our house it helped to stop buying anything that wasn't compatible with our version of low carb. The incompatible items that were already in my cupboards gradually disappeared. At the same time, I was stocking up on lots of protein and vegetables.

    It was a challenge to get my older son on board, but when I did, that was very helpful. Low carb became house custom.

    The other thing that helped was to get my husband's cooperation. At first, he would make comments to the younger one like "You poor thing, I feel your pain." It's much more helpful to make comments like "Yum yum, Mama has made us a banquet, we get to eat like kings tonight." (Note the "we" instead of "you".)

    I am very curious to see if anyone else notices any difference in symptoms of TS, ADHD or sensory issues with diet.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    I'm not a parent but I am using diet to help with my own TS+

    Here are the information sources I've been using:

    Wise Traditions London 2010 - Natasha Campbell McBride - YouTube

    GAPS Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) - Natural treatment for autism, ADHD/ADD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia


    The first link will also give a lot more related videos about this and what I love about it is that the only side effect of it is spending more time exploring really satisfying food in the kitchen with family, which I consider a nice trade-off.
    Last edited by LeaOtto; February 22, 2015 at 09:05 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    Quote Originally Posted by LeaOtto View Post
    I'm not a parent but I am using diet to help with my own TS+

    Here are the information sources I've been using:

    Wise Traditions London 2010 - Natasha Campbell McBride - YouTube

    GAPS Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) - Natural treatment for autism, ADHD/ADD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia


    The first link will also give a lot more related videos about this and what I love about it is that the only side effect of it is spending more time exploring really satisfying food in the kitchen with family, which I consider a nice trade-off.

    What kind of results have you found? I have another son with food intolerances so I am a firm believer that diet is the culprit of many "ills" haven't really seen a difference in my son with TS tics with diet change. Perhaps I need to stick with it longer?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    To answer your question:
    Ya, progress is slow but steady and there are some specific principles you must stick to I compare it to building the iron for an anemic person. In the worst cases it takes about two years, however I can tell you from personal experience it continues to be unbelievably beneficial for me and really rewarding. What the research and lifestyle aim to do is restore the health of the digestive system. The video explains why this is important and how a compromised digestive system impacts a lot of things: immunity, the nervous system, mental health and pretty much everything else in some form or another. I don't think it improves the number of tics directly as such but my tic bouts before where often painful and really disrupted my coordination. Our digestive systems are a huge part of the organs which deal with cleaning out both toxins coming in from outside but also metabolic processes like cleaning out neurochemicals and nervous system cells which have reached the end of their life cycle. When the gut is not working properly, and there are a lot of things which can disrupt this, the body has a harder time doing this job and so people end up with used cells staying in the system and gumming up normal processes, especially those with neurological disorders. My overall coordination and stamina during tic bouts has increased a lot since I've started this. I couldn't really put an accurate number on that increase, it has improved that much.
    It also provides a million times more raw energy my body can use and eliminates the health issues like, not having a healthy weight, skin issues like acne etc, nutritional deficiencies like low iron, being regular and having good bowel movements, tissue repair and menstration, being lethargic and struggling with having enough energy during times when I needed more, I could write a book on what is has improved.

    It sounds like you might be interested so what I'd recommend for you is to get Dr Natasha's book titled Gut and Psychology Syndrome. She has a clinic in the UK that identifies kids with these neurological difficulties and digestive system difficulties as well, they seem to go hand in hand with most cases. Her poor little clinic is swamped though so she wrote the book as a self help book for parents and individuals who want to help themselves. It is geared towards treating Autistic and Scizophrenic people but like in my case the same treatment benefits everyone else lower down on the spectrum and with related disorders.

    The basics:

    # 1, Animal fats are ok. The original assumption was that those fats are bad for us but it was never researched or tested. From an academic level I have functioned a lot better on a high fat diet, fewer migraines, more mental stamina and an interesting aside my mom is also on this diet and it has made her transition through menopause extremely mild and only slightly and very rarely unpleasant. I was amazed actually, her's has been a very graceful and inspiring example which makes me smile every day when I see her so easily comfortable and healthy.

    2) Organ meats: Yes! (dances) weekly and if fussy eating is an issue there is a chapter in the book regarding that <3

    #3: therapy strength probiotic, and I'm talking the real stuff not store bought. We ferment our own cabbages in a crock pot which can be ordered from Home hardware. It's quite easy and there are many veggies to choose from, to kind of, break the ice. Zuchinni makes a lovely fermented homemade relish, carrots turn out sweet and enjoyably foamy, red cabbage and beats are lovely, cucumber is a good introductory as well as chinese cabbage, the last takes less time and is really nice with ginger and a bit of garlic. There are many tutorials online I can also share how we do the process.

    This whole thing does require complete avoidance to certain foods: all grains, all processed stuff, all legumes, all unnatural additives. But 99 percent of a lot of peoples diets are based off those and I can't help wonder why so many people are sick. "Ill" you said it! Just go back to the basic primal way of living and we'd all find ourselves healthier.

    I'll finish off with the term paleo. Unrelated to Dr Natasha those exploring paleolithic diets have found striking similarities between gaps and paleo. There are some difference but looking up paleo recipes and cookbooks also provides opportunities for variety and exploration. My mom and I have been encouraged to see how much the paleo movement has grown. It's easy to adapt paleo to gaps and vice versa.

    I know I've gone on for quite a lot, but I hope that helps answer and elaborate on things for your question.
    Good luck, I hope things get better for you.

    Lea

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    Thanks a bunch.

    I personally don't really need a lot of convincing as I and one of my children are on a "paleo" ish diet. For headaches and other chronic issues.

    My husband and TS son don't buy into it but if I have evidence it will my job getting them on board much easier . Are you on any supplements other than probiotic? My TS son takes Mag/cal, Bcalm, Fish oil, Vit D supplements and he says he feels better when he takes them. Thanks again

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Diet and Tics

    I don't generally take anything pharmaceutical. The only exception to this is sometimes in the summer, if I'm travelling and in between batches of fermented stuff, I get some probiotic capsules from the drug store to tide me over.

    As for other things that might be considered supplements, I just eat the basic/ original foods. There are cans of tuna and sardines which are packed in olive oil and salt, no msgs or additives. These make a nice on the road snack or quicky brunch type filler.

    I also love teas, both for enjoyment and also medicinally. I've done extensive research on which one's: cause muscle relaxation, reduce pain, help the immune system, stimulate or sedate the metabolism, help digest things. I make my own blends of different herb and spice teas in place of pharmaceutical pain killers or as drinks or snacks. There are even ones that help you feel less hungry, like nettle and fennel tea.

    Does that answer your question? I can also go into detail about what exactly my mom and I eat.

    :p Also, sorry about preaching to the choir. I did notice a couple of others liked my explanation so I hope you can forgive me.

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