Thanks Thanks:  2
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Mom of 10 year old with TS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Age
    44
    Posts
    4

    Default Mom of 10 year old with TS

    Hi All,
    I am glad to see this forum and hope to get to know you so we can support each other. I am in Wisconsin. My main concern with my son is not so much his motor/vocal tics. Because it doesn't bother him and his classmates do not make fun of him. His current vocal tic isn't too bad. It sounds like a little mouse squeeking.

    What I am most concerned about is the behaviors that I see. So much anger and quick to be upset. He is a very sweet boy otherwise but when he has a blow up, he gets very very angry and screams. It affects his school, friends, our home life as you can imagine. My boy is so very very sensitive...

    Would like to connect with other parents and people with TS to help me be the best parent that I can for him.

    Hope to see you around
    ~Julie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,939

    Default Re: Mom of 10 year old with TS

    Hello Julie and welcome to the TC Forum! Glad you've joined us and we'll be looking forward to your participation.

    Glad to hear your son's tic symptoms are not an issue. It sounds as though he has great family and peer support which should serve him well as he grows into a well adjusted adult!

    His current vocal tic isn't too bad. It sounds like a little mouse squeeking.
    As you know, tics involve involuntary muscle movements, which are usually flexed or extended to their extremes. Phonic and vocal tics use vocal cords (they are muscles too) to make sounds and words.

    What I am most concerned about is the behaviors that I see. So much anger and quick to be upset.
    Rage reactions or "storms" occur in many of us with TS and have less to do with anger than with sensory overload, although the outward expression and interpretation by those around us can be troubling.

    You may find some insights in the "sticky" posts in the Forum's Anger Section.

    At your son's age of ten, as his sense of self awareness matures (usually between ten and thirteen) you may want to look into behavioural therapies (CBT) to help him manage his rage reactions. A therapist with training in behavioural therapy for kids with Tourette would be ideal, but any child psychologist would probably have anger management strategies that could help.

    Has your son ever received any form of therapy or treatment for his TS or related symptoms?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Age
    44
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Mom of 10 year old with TS

    Hi Steve,
    Thanks

    Yes, son is getting therapy to help him with feeling his feelings as far as identifying them and we are to first validate them and help him identify, and then finding tools to help calm him when he is upset. Also we are trying to help him not even get to that point in the first place and notating his triggers as there are a few that are obvious to us but many that are not.

    His school also helps him in trying to help him with calming strategies and he has an IEP (not sure they are called that in Canada?) and he gets special services such as extra time on tests, a scribe for the times that writing is difficult, he gets to leave the classroom when sensory issues and other things just get to be too much for him. And other things that I can't think of at the moment, but I am so lucky to have such great communication with the school staff. They are a life saver and I am very picky when it comes to the care for my son....always have been but I feel that he is in good hands at school because they are always trying to find ways to help him succeed. Most of the time the walk down to the counselors office does wonders. Just getting out of the situation will pop him out of a mood. Not always but a lot of times...then he can return to class feeling better and able to move on with his day.

    As of lately though he's had an increase of episodes where I am contacted from school and it has become so difficult emotionally to see him have such a hard time. He is the most important person in my life and dedicate my life to helping him have a happy future.

    Again, thanks Steve!

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    At your son's age of ten, as his sense of self awareness matures (usually between ten and thirteen) you may want to look into behavioural therapies (CBT) to help him manage his rage reactions. A therapist with training in behavioural therapy for kids with Tourette would be ideal, but any child psychologist would probably have anger management strategies that could help.

    Has your son ever received any form of therapy or treatment for his TS or related symptoms?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    5,939

    Default Re: Mom of 10 year old with TS

    Julie,

    It sounds like your son is indeed a fortunate young man to have your love and support as well as a supportive educational system.

    Has his therapist been alerted to the increased occurrences of these episodes? Any thoughts as to whether there may be some new triggers in his life?

    His therapist may have already proposed relaxation techniques such as diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery...you may find the following interesting:

    Teach Yourself Your Child Relaxation

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    366

    Default Re: Mom of 10 year old with TS

    In addition to Steve's ideas -- all great -- here are some thoughts.

    Do you ever go in and just observe your son in school for an hour or so, when you haven't been contacted because of a problem? I have a feeling it will be easier for you to notice what's not working for him in his current school environment, more easily than the teacher could. Partly because you know your son better and can more easily see the world through his eyes, and partly because she's busy doing a lot of stuff, focusing on many different children at a time, but when you're observing, you are free to just take it all in.

    Maybe the TSA has someone experienced in your area who can go in and do some observing as well. If not, you could review the catalog of accommodations, and the FBA Workbook. I'll attach them.

    I'm glad he has the accommodation set up that he can step out when he needs to, to let off some steam.

    Maybe he needs some additional, scheduled breaks. He might also need more opportunities for things like movement, music, rhythm, sensory play, etc., built into the day. Could you check his IEP and see if he gets Occupational Therapy? It would be great if he could have 20-30 minutes of OT every day, or if they can't manage that, then every other day.

    It's also possible that he's getting some sensory overload. The cafeteria can often do this to a child with TS.

    I would first try the hypothesis that if he's acting very stressed out, with a lot of upsets, that could be an indication that there is a bit too much stress in his day. So, look at his school day, find the things that are stressors for him, and see if a little bit of restructuring eases things for him.

    You might also want to see his doctor and do a careful review of symptoms and meds (if he takes any, or if you are open to considering some, that is).

    I sometimes find it easier to have a productive conversation with my son's doctor if we talk on the phone or if I go in to see her on my own. Or, sometimes I ask my husband to take my son out of the examining room and go have some fun in the waiting room or outside. If it's a big enough facility, they can do some exploring, visit the lunch room, etc.

    Check if your son is getting enough exercise.

    I was thinking about what the therapist wants you to do -- "we are to first validate them and help him identify, and then finding tools to help calm him when he is upset." That sounds good in general, and is part of the toolbox, but with Tourette's, you need a few other things too.

    - Model acceptable ways of expressing ungentlemanly feelings. If you bang your thumb really hard with a hammer, I have a feeling you're going to make a scene. But hopefully you don't throw the hammer across the room! Do you see what I mean? Maybe sometimes it would be good not to approach the situation with a lot of words. Could you set out a variety of acceptable ways of showing anger? Punching bag, stationary bicycle, pillow that can stand being whomped against a bed or a sofa repeatedly, a stack of scratch paper that can be ripped into strips, etc. Then, if you accidentally burn the bacon, could you demonstrate a controlled Mommy tantrum with one of these objects? Perhaps the next day, when your son gets upset about something, you could then offer him, or lead him to, the object you used the day before.

    We have an old, beat up, hand-me-down drumset that makes a whole lot of noise. That works well. In good weather it can feel really good to kick a ball very, very hard, repeatedly.

    At a certain point, a child reaches the age when he wants to be by himself when he's upset, and just rage a bit on his own, and then calm himself down on his own. I don't know if your son is there now -- but watch for it, everyone gets there at some point. He'll show you that's what he wants, by retreating, perhaps to his room, perhaps banging the door on his way in. Don't worry, this will become more graceful with practice.

    Of course, if your son starts destroying things, or frightening you, then, of course, you need to intervene and help him calm down. Sometimes I help my son slow down his breathing by breathing with him.

    If he's hyperventilating (quick, shallow breaths), have him hold a small paper bag over his mouth, and breathe in and out of that a few times.

    I know these ideas were all over the place -- just see if any of them fit your situation. Good luck!

    Accommodation_E125.pdf
    FBA-workbook.PDF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •